CHRONOLOGICAL
LIST OF
PRINCESS ABBESSES
1600-1918


In German: Fürstäbtissin/Reichsäbtissin,
French: Abbesse Princesse/Princesse d'Empire
and Dutch: Vorstin-Abdis
and other Abbesses with territorial or
ecclesiastical powers.
Also see women clergy

Among the many principalities of The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation were a number of Ecclesiastical Territories were ruled by an Abbess with the title of Princess-Abbess (Fürstäbtissin or Reichsäbtissin). The Imperial Immediacies (Reichsfreiheit or Reichsunmittelbarkeit) held a privileged feudal and political status under the direct authority of the Holy Roman Emperor and the Imperial Diet, without any intermediary Liege lord(s) and therefore had the right to collect taxes and tolls and held juridical rights themselves. The territories held seats in the College of Prelates of Swabia or the Rhine, which held a joint vote in the College of Princes of the Diet of the Holy Roman Empire. Many of the numerous other minor Convents, Abbeys and Ladies Chapters functioned as landowners, regional administrators and fiefholders and exercised the lower court right.

There were also Abbesses with Quasi-Episcopal Powers in Italy and Spain


 

1600-15 Princess-Abbess Ursula Giel von Gielsberg of Säckingen (Germany)

A nun at Tämkon until she was allowed to move to Säckingen, where she was elected Princess by the Chapter consisting of 3 canonisses and 3 canons in the presence of representatives of the Bishop and the Government of Vorderöasterreich. Her brother, Gabril was Prince-Abbot of Murback 1573 and another relative, Roman Giel von Gielsberg, was Prince-Abbot of Kempten (1639-73). She was daughter of Christoph Giel von Gielsberg zu Glattburg, Diocesian Steward of Klingenau (Bischöflichen Vogts) and Barbara Muntprat von Spiegelberg and (d. 1615).


 

1600-36 Reigning Abbess Margarethe von Werdenstein of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

Mentioned as Kustorin 1597, reformed the chapter 1607 and in 1632 the canonisses escaped to Konstanz, Überlingen and Pfullendorf. She lived (1557-1638).


Fürstäbtissin Maria zu Quedlinburg, née Herzogin zu Sachsen-Weimar

1601-10 Princess-Abbess Maria von Sachsen-Weimar of Quedlinburg (Germany)

The 31st Fürstäbtissin was daughter of Duke Johann Wilhelm and Pfalzgräfin bei Rhein Dorothea Susanna, she lived (1571-1610).


 

1600-03 Reigning Abbess Barbe II de Bailleul of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Daughter of the Lord d'Eecke and Steenvoorde.


 

1601-04 Princess-Abbess Anne Marguerite de Namur of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles (Belgium)

The Lady was daughter of Philippe de Namur, Seigneur de Trivieres and Jacqueline van Liedekerke. The paternal lordship was inherited by her sister, Marie (d. 1603), who was married to Jacques de la Hamayde.


 

1601-04 Reigning Abbess-General María de Navarra y de la Cueva of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

The abbess of the Abbey held quasi-episcopal powers.

1602-10 Princess-Abbess  Regina von Schrattenbach of Göss bei Leoben (Austria) Member of a noble family in Niederösterreich.

1602-11 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth I de Salm of Remiremont, Dame of San Pierre and Metz (France)

Resigned in favour of Catherine de Lorraine ad received a large pension. She was daughter of Friedrich I de Salm, Wild- und Rheingraf in Dhaun et Neufville-sur-Moselle, of the French branch of the family, and Franziska zu Salm. Around 1605 the copper production in the mines at Thillot reached its maximum. She lived (circa 1577-1611).


 

Until 1602 Princess-Abbess Margaretha von Manderscheid
-Blankenheim-Gerolstein of Eltern and Vreden (Germany)

Her sister, Elisabeth, was Fürstäbtissin of Essen (1575-78) until she abdicated in order to marry Count Wirich von Daun-Falkenstein. They were daughters of Count Arnold and Margaretha von Wied, Fürstäbtissin Margaretha lived (1539-1602).


 

1603-20 Reigning Abbess Jacqueline de Lannoy of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Daughter of the Lord of Hautmont.


The seal of the Abbess of Gerresheim

1604-21 Princess-Abbess Felicitas II von Eberstein of Herford (Germany)

The Countess had apparently been Abbess of Gerresheim until 1585, and in 1603 she is named as Koadjutorin of Herford. 1609 the War of Succession for the territory of Jülich-Berg-Kleve-Ravensberg which lasted until 1647 and laid great strains on the chapter.


 

1602-45 Princess-Abbess Agnes Elisabeth von Limburg-Styrum und Bronckhorst of Elten, Vreden, Freckenhorst and Borghorst (Germany)
1640 Hereditary Countess of Holstein-Schaumburg-Gemen

In 1619 she gave the Vredener Hungertuch (Cloth of Hunger) to the city of Vreden, which depicts 11 passion-pictures and an inscription in Latin stating: "Agnes, by the Grace of God, Abbess to Elten, Vreden, Freckenhorst und Borghorst, Countess von Limburg und Bronckhorst, has given this ornament in the honour of the sufferings of Christ..." In 1635 her sister's son; Jobst-Hermann von Holstein-Schaumburg-Gemen, Count of Bückeburg, died unmarried. He was first succeeded by his cousin, Otto, but he died after four years, and she managed to secure the inheritance of Gemen for herself against the claims of the Holstein-Schaumburg-family, and then ceded the lordship to her nephew, Count Hermann-Otto I von Limburg-Styrum. Her sister, Metta, was also Abbes in Freckenhorst. She was daughter of Count Jobst von Limburg und Bronckhorst and Maria von Schauenburg und Holstein-Pinneberg, and lived (1563-1645).

 

1604-31 Princess-Abbess Anna von der Marck of Thorn, Lady of Thorn, Ittervoort, Grathem, Baexem, Stramproy, Ell, Haler and Molenbeerse (The Netherlands)

Daughter of Count Johann II von der Marck and Margareta van Wassenaer, she succeeded her sister, Josiana, as sovereign, and she managed to keep the principality relatively unharmed in spite of the 30th year war. Anna lived (1551-1631).


Marguerite VI de Nivelles

Circa 1604-23 Princess-Abbess Marguerite VI de Haynin of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles (Belgium)

Took over as head of the chapter and ruler of the city from Anne-Marguerite van Namur, who died 1604.


 

1604-08 Reigning Abbess-General Francisca de Villamízar Cabeza de Vac of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Member of a family of explorers of the new world and governors in South America.

Elisabeth IX von Essen

1605-14 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth IX van Berge-s’Heerenberg of Essen, Lady of Breisig, Huckard and Rellinghausen (Germany)

Her election to the post of abbess took place under dubious circumstances. At the time, the Chapter only consisted of three protestant Ladies of the Chapter, and according to the regulations the abbess had to be elected among the three. But the Archbishop of Köln gave dispensation so that she could be elected. She was catholic and reintroduced Catholicism to the Chapter. She was daughter of Count Willem van Berg-s’Heerenberg and Maria van Oranje-Nassau, and lived (1581-1616).


 

1605-10 Princess-Abbess Veronica von Freyberg of Heggbach (Germany)

1605 and 1606 heavy "Turk Taxes" were imposed on the territory, which was also hit by the plague. The right of High Court was transferred from the Chapter to the Paternal Abbey of Salem during her reign and in 1610 the nuns and other inhabitants of the convent fled for the plague to Biberach and Weitenau. She resigned because of bad health. (d. 1613)


 

1605-10 Princess-Abbess Veronica von Freyberg of Heggbach (Germany)

1605 and 1606 heavy "Turk Taxes" were imposed on the territory, which was also hit by the plague. The right of High Court was transferred from the Chapter to the Paternal Abbey of Salem during her reign and in 1610 the nuns and other inhabitants of the convent fled for the plague to Biberach and Weitenau. She resigned because of bad health. (d. 1613)


Fürstäbtissin Eva von Uhrhausen

1605-16 Princess-Abbess Eva von Uhrhausen of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

The chapter was placed directly under the king as the other states in Germany and it was granted royal protection and, immunity in 1002. In 1494 the Fürstäbtissin was granted a seat in the College of Swabian Prelates who had a joint vote in the Ecclesiastical Bench in the Council of Princes of the Diet of the Holy Roman Diet and in 1521 she was mentioned as Imperial Prelate in an inventory of the Reichsstände - the territories of the Realm.


 

Until 1605 Reigning Abbess Françoise de la Châtre of Faremoutiers (France)

Succeeded her sister, Anne, who reigned at a not known time. They were members of the family of the barons de Montfort. (d. 1605).


 

1608-49 Princess-Abbess Katharina Praxedis von Perckhausen of Obermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

The chapter became an immediate realm in 833 and the abbess held the rank of a Princess of the Holy Roman Realm and reigned over the canonesses in the chapter and the subjects in the territories belonging to the chapter, which held a seat and vote in the Diet of the Realm and on the Bavarian Landtag. In ecclesiastical affairs she was subject to the Prince Bishop of Regensburg and in secular affairs she was obliged to consult the canonesses, so she was not a absolute ruler.


 

1608-11 Reigning Abbess-General Juana de Leiba of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

By the favour of the king, she was invested with almost royal prerogatives, and exercised an unlimited secular authority over more than 60 villages. Like Bishops, she held her own courts, in civil and criminal cases, granted letters dismissorial for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests, within the limits of her abbatial jurisdiction, to hear confessions, to preach, and to engage in the cure of souls. She was privileged also to confirm Abbesses, to impose censures, and to convoke synods.

 

1609-14, 1620-26 and 1629-32 Reigning Abbess-General Isabel de Mendoza II of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Her official title was "noble Lady, the superior, prelate, and lawful administratrix in spirituals and temporals", and she reigned over vast territories in Castilla and Leon.

 

1610-50 Princess-Abbess Katharina II von Spaur-Pflaum und Valör of Buchau (Germany)

The Baroness (Freiin) was in dispute with the bishop on Konstanz and the College of Counts, defending her own position and travelled to Vienna to discuss her affairs with the emperor, and during the Thirty Years War, she was able to keep the territory out of trouble - not the least because of the connections with her brother, Dominikus Virgil, who was Colonel in the Army of the League and Erbschenk and Governor of Tirol. 1622 Mentioned as a Prelate of the Realm (Reichsprälatin). Her sister, Maria Clara, was Princess-Abbess of Essen (1614-44) and another sister, Anna Genvra, was Abbess of Sonnenberg (1622-52). Katharina was daughter of Leo Freiherr von Spaur, Pfaum und Valör (or Valier) and Juliane Barbara, Countess Federici, and lived (1580-1650).


Fürstäbtissin Dorothea zu Quedlinburg, Herzogin von Sachsen

1610-17 Princess-Abbess Dorothea von Sachsen of Quedlinburg (Germany)

1615 she started printing her own coins. Daughter of Kurfürst Christian I von Sachsen and Margravine Sophia von Brandenburg, and lived (1591-1617).


 

1610-27 Princess-Abbess Barbara II Hörburger of Heggbach (Germany)

Former Secretary and around the time of her reign, the Abbesses of the Chapter used the title of: "Die hochwürdige Frau des hochlöblichen Reichstifts und Gotteshauses Heggabach Äbbtissin und Frau - (The high-worthy Lady of the Highly appraisable Imperial Immediate Chapter and House of God Abbess and Lady). And the Abbess was hailed as their ruler by the inhabitants the towns and villages of her territory after her election by the other nuns.


 

1610-30 Princess-Abbess Anna Segesser of Gutenzell (Germany)

Succeeded Maria Segesser.

1610-40 Princess-Abbess Margaretha IV von Khünburg of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
Her family originally came from Croatia and moved to Austria in the 15th century and were given a Countly title, held high offices in the army or in the church. She was a great promoter of the chapter.

 

1611-29 Reigning Abbess-General Ana de Jesus de Austria of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Natural daughter of Dona Maria de Mendoza and Don Juan de Austria, a Spanish Prince and Army Leader. She is well noted for her indirect involvement in a conspiration of an alleged king Sebastian of Portugal. In a document she was named "Dilectae in Christo Filiae Anne ab Austria Abbatissae Monasterii Monialium de Las Huelgas propre et extramuros Civitatis Burgensis Nullius Dioecesis, Ordinis Cisterciensis"

Dorothea Auguste von Gandersheim, Prinzessin von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel

1611-25 Princess-Abbess Dorothea Auguste von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel of Gandersheim (Germany)

Former Koadjutor. She had to flee for the army of Tilly which was on its way to Wolfenbüttel. Daughter of Julius von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel and Dorothea von Sachsen. Died of the plague. Her older sisters, Sophia-Hedwig, reigned her dowries in Pommern from 1677 and Elisabeth was Contra-Abbess of Gandersheim 1578-82.She lived (1577-1625).

1611-37 Reigning Abbess Louise II de Bourbon-Lavedan of the Royal Abbey of Fontevraud (France)

Aided by the famous Capuchins, Ange de Joyeuse and Joseph du Tremblay, the Princess sought to improve the status of the monks of St-Jean de l'Habit and made various attempts to establish theological seminaries for them. Daughter of Charles de Bourbon, Vicomte de Lavedan - son of Jean II, Duke of Bourbon and Auvergne - and Jeanne Louise d'Albret.


1612-48 Princesse-Abbesse Catherine IV de Lorraine-Vaudemont of Remiremont (France)

Coadjutrice from 1602. In 1638 the troops of Turenne occupied Remiremont for a month. The following year the Princess obtained the neutrality of Vosges (for Epinal, Remiremont, Bruyère, St Dié, Arches) for the rest of the Thirty Years War. She tried to reform the convent, but failed and also founded the Monastery of the Ladies du Saint Sacrement in Nancy, and was daughter of François II de Vaudemont, duke of Lorraine, and lived (1576-1648).


 

1612-38 Princess-Abbess Anna IV von Bellheim zu Baumgarden of Schänis (Switzerland)

Elected on 21 January and inagurated on 6 may. The Bishop confirmed the new statutes that had been drawn up after the fires in 1585 and 1610, and the Papal Nuntius gave his approval in 1616. The fact that all the documents, treaties and privileges were destroyed lead to more and more conflicts with the Cantons of Glarus and Schwyz, which were guardians of the chapter, but considered the noble chapter an alien body in the area and treated it as such.


 

1612-14 Abbess Nullius Donata Acquaviva d’Aragona of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Another chronology of Abbesses lists her as ruler 1637-38. Daughter of Don Giulio Antonio Acquaviva d’Aragona, 19th Count di Conversano, di San Flaviano e Castellana and created Duca di Noci in 1600, and Donna Caterina Acquaviva d’Aragona, Heiress to the Duchy di Nardò.


 

1614-44 Princess-Abbess Maria Clara von Spaur-Pflaum und Valör of Essen, Lady of Breisig, Huckard and Rellinghausen (Germany)

From 1612 she had been Lady of the Chapter and Dechantess of Vreden, in 1616 she also became Abbess of Nottuln and 1621 of Metelen. In 1623, during the Thirty Years War, Essen received a Spanish garrison. The following year the re-catholisation-law was introduced, non-catholic books banned and the obligatory church attendance reintroduced. In 1629 the Spanish bastion fell to the Dutch, and a council dominated by protestants took over power of the City of Essen, Maria Clara fled to Köln, only to return for a short period in 1631. Her sister reigned as Princess-Abbess Katharina II of Buchau, (1610-50). Maria Clara lived (circa 1590-1644).


 

1614-34 Princess-Abbess Susanna von Bubenhofen of Lindau   (Germany)

In 1628 the Emperor employed troops in the City of Lindau after internal riots, and he tried to re-catholisise the City and to tie it closer to Austria. The head of the Catholic chapter, Fürstäbtissin Susanna, was member of an old Prussian noble family.


 

1615-21 Princess-Abbess Maria Brümsi von Herblingen of Säckingen (Germany)

The City of Bad Säckingen was occupied several times during the Thirty Years War. Her cousin, Katherina Brümsi von Herblingen, was Fürstäbtissin von Schänis 1587-1612. Maria was daughter of Johann Kaspar Brümsi and Anna von Roppach.


 

1616-52 Princess-Abbess Anna Maria von Salis of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

During her reign the church of the Chapter was redecorated in Baroque-style. Daughter of Albert Abstemius von Salis, a member of an old noble family from Graubünden in Switzerland, and Margaretha von Porta. She lived (1590-1652).


 

1617-34 Abbess Nullius Caterina Acquaviva d'Aragona of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Also listed as ruler in 1624-30. Sister of Donna Barbara, the Abbess from 1558.


 Fürstäbtissin Dorothea Sophia zu Quedlinburg

1618-45 Princess-Abbess Dorothea Sophia zu Sachsen of Quedlinburg (Germany)

The Thirty Year War reached the city in 1622 and four years later the city is hit by the plague. In the Neustadt 2.374 people died within six months. 1632 Wilhelm von Weimar passed through Quedlinburg and the following year the city was occupied by - and forced to accommodate - Imperial and Swedish troops, who also looted the city and forced the citizen to supply them with money and goods. 1636 the city was hit by another epidemic of plague. The regiment of the Swedish colonel Bleicke occupied the city from 1639-41 when fightings broke out between the imperial colonel Laba and Count Johann Ludwig of the Rhine. 1642 General  Königsmark was in Quedlinburg. Duchess Dorothea-Sophia daughter of Duke Friedrich Wilhelm and Duchess Sophia von Württemberg, and lived (1587-1645).


 

1618-25-? Princess-Abbess Anna Raitz von Frentz of Burtscheid (Germany)

The first of four members of the Freiherrliche family of Raitz von Frentz to reign the state in the period until 1669. It is not known how long she reigned, but Henrica Raitz von Frentz is mentioned in 1643.


 

1620-40 Reigning Abbess Marie IV de Bonnières of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Daughter of the Lord de Biez and Marie de Tournai.


 

1621-40 Princess-Abbess Magdalene II zur Lippe of Herford (Germany)

Maria Klara Theresia von Wartenberg was Contra-Abbess 1629-31. Herford became a Free City (Reichstadt) in 1631 and this saved the territory from occupation during the first part of the 30 years war. Magdalene was daughter of Count Simon VI zur Lippe (1554-1613) and his second wife, Countess Elisabeth von Holstein-Schaumburg, and lived (1595-1640).


 

1621-58 Princess-Abbess Agnes III von Greuth of Säckingen (Germany)

1630 she cleared the relationship between the chapter and the Town of Säckingen. And during the The Thirty Year War the chapter had to pay heavy taxes and requisitions. The chapter fled for the Swedish and French troops to Baden. Laufenburg was plundered and on top of that came the plague. 1648 she wrote to King Louis XIV of France asking for an end to the war contributions and 1652 she was the last Fürstäbtissn of the Chapter to be invited to the Diet of the Realm (Reichstag). A relative, Maria Cecilia ,was Princess-Abbess of Schänis 1652-64. Agnes was daughter of Christoph von Greuth zu Jestetten and Catharina Muntprat von Spiegelberg.


 

1623-30 Princess-Abbess Isabelle II de Schouteete van Zuylen of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles (Belgium)

Member of an old Belgian family of high nobility.


Abbess Jehanne II of Jouarre 

1624-38 Reigning Abbess Jehanne II de Lorraine of Jouarre (France)

Also known as Jeanne, she initiated sweeping monastic reforms in the Abbey and raised from the Crypt the remains of St Ebregisile and the founders of the Abbey in presence of Queen Marie de Medicis and transferred them to the reliquaries which are now in the Parish Church. They were brought out for processions, on Whit Tuesday and sometimes during public calamities. Jehanne de Lorraine demolished the old abbey church and rebuilt it splendidly. She was daughter Henri I de Guise, Duc de Guise, Prince de Joinville, (1550-88), who was murdered for becoming a protestant, and Catherine de Nevers (1548-1633). She lived (1586-1638).


 

1625-30 Princess-Abbess Juliana Rembold of Baindt (Germany)

The Abbey was founded 1227, and it's Princess-Abbess had been Sovereign Ruler of the Ecclesiastical Territory since around 1373 with the rank of a Princess of The Empire.


 

1625-49 Princess-Abbess Katharina Elisabeth von Oldenburg-Delmenhorst of Gandersheim (Germany)

Because of the ongoing wars she resided in Delmenhorst and there were numerous fights among the employees of the chapter. The city of Gandersheim was occupied several times by Tilly's troops in 1626. Also known as Catharina Elisabeth she was daughter of Duke Anton II of Oldenburg Delmenhorst and Sibylle Elisabeth of Braunschweig-Dannenberg, regent of Delmenhorst 1619-30. One sister, Sidonia, was sovereign of Herford (1640-49) before her marriage to Duke August Philip von Schleswig-Holstein-Sønderborg-Beck, and another, Sibylla Maria, was Dechantin of Herford until 1638.  Catharina Elisabeth lived (1603-49).


 

Before 1626 and 1650-54 Princess-Abbess Maria von Effern, genant Hall of Keppel (Germany)

The Chapter had been protestant since 1572 and but as a result of the counter-reformation initiated by Johann VIII VIII von Nassau  (1623-1638), the Chapter was abolished 1626 and transferred to the Jesuits. She manages to have the Chapter restored as a double-convent with both Protestant and Catholic Ladies of the Chapter. Until it's secularisation in 1806 the post of Abbesses alternated between the two denominations.


 

1627-29 Princess-Abbess Barbara III Gräter of Heggbach (Germany)

The former Prioress, she died of the plague, and lived (1567-1629).


 

1627-29 Reigning Abbess Marie Henriette de Bourbon of Chelles (France)

Daughter of King Henri V of France and his mistress Charlotte des Essarts de la Haye, and lived (1609-29).


 

1629-71 Reigning Abbess Madeleine II de la Porte de La Meilleraye of Chelles (France)

Daughter of King Henri V of France and his mistress Charlotte des Essarts de la Haye, and lived (1609-29).


 

1629-31 Contra-Abbess Maria Klara Theresia von Wartenberg  of Herford (Germany)

Elected in oppostition to the Princess-Abbess Magdalene II zur Lippe, who reigned 1621-40.


 

1629-35 Princess-Abbess Margaretha II Täschler of Heggbach (Germany)

Daughter of a Mayor of Ravensburg and former nurse, gatekeeper and prioress before her election. In 1632 the ladies of the chapter fled for the Swedish troops first to Waldsee and Biberach and then further into Switzerland. 1634 she was taken hostage in Ravensburg by Swedish troops together with the Abbess of Gutenzell and the Abbots of Weissenau and Schussenried and only released against a large ransom. In 1635 the first ladies returned, but Margaretha died of the plague, after having lived (1591-1635).


 

1629-33 Reigning Abbess-General Ana Maria Manrique de Lara of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Descendant of the kings of Navarra, Vicounts of Narbona, Lords of Molina and later counts of Aguilar, which held high, state office and were very influential.

 

1630-54 Princess-Abbess Adrienne II de Lannoy of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles  (Belgium)

Member of an old and illustrious Belgian noble family, the Lords and Dames of Lannoy etc.


 

1630-44 Princess-Abbess Katharina III Rueff of Baindt (Germany)

In May 1632 the Chapter was attacked by the Swedes for the first time, and most of the nuns escaped. In the autumn of 1635 seven of the nuns died of the plague within a few weeks. And in 1643 the chapter was looted three times.


 

1630-63 Princess-Abbess Barbara Thumb of Gutenzell (Germany)

In 1632 the ladies of the Chapter fled the approaching Swedes and escaped to Steiermark. As they left in 1646 they put the Chapter on fire.


 

1631-32 Princess-Abbess Josina Walpurgis von Löwenstein-Rochefort of Thorn, Lady of Thorn, Ittervoort, Grathem, Baexem, Stramproy, Ell, Haler and Molenbeerse (The Netherlands)

The Countess was only 15 when elected to the post of sovereign of the Eccleastical territory after the death of her aunt, Anna von der Marck in March. She had a secret relationship to Count Herman Frederik van den Bergh and in December she married him secretly and returned to Thorn. When her father, father, Johann Dietrich, Count von Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rochefort, heard about the wedding in 1632, he put her in the very strict Chapter of Rochefort, but after four years she escaped and was reunited with her husband. They did not have any children. She lived (1615-83).


 

1632-46 Princess-Abbess Anna Eleonora von Stauffen of Thorn, Lady of Thorn, Ittervoort, Grathem, Baexem, Stramproy, Ell, Haler and Molenbeerse (The Netherlands)
1645-46 Princess-Abbess of Essen, Lady of Breisig, Huckard and Rellinghausen (Germany)

She had been Dechantin or Decaness of Essen before she was elected Princess-Abbes of Thorn, and was the first to be elected sovereign of both territories. Both Chapters held a vote in the Geistlischen Fürstenbank (Bench of Lords Spiritual) of the Westphalischer Kreis (Westphalian Circle), and therefore held two votes in the regional assembly. She also had two votes in the College of the Prelates of the Rhine, whose 17 members (Princess-Abbesses and Prince-Abbots) had a joint vote in the Council of the Princes of the Imperial Diet, where the representative of the Prelates sat on the Ecclesiastical Bench. The Chapter of Thorn became a member of the Imperial Diet in 1640.


 

1633-36 and 1639-41 Reigning Abbess-General Catalina de Arellano y de Zúñiga of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Probably related to Felipe Ramírez de Arellano, Conde de Aguilar, who was Viceroy of Navarra 1618-20.

 

1634-76 Princess-Abbess Anna Christiane Hundbiss von Waltrams of Lindau (Germany)

1646-47 the City of Lindau was under siege during the 30th Year War. Swedish troops tried to conquer the city, the citizen fought back. After the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, the Imperial Troops left the city and the Confessional Independence of the City was confirmed - it remained Protestant. The Catholic Fürstäbtissin Anna Christiane was member of a noble family from Württemberg, which also spells its name as Hundpiß von Waltrams.


 

1636-41 Princess-Abbess Maria Magalena von und zu Eltz of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)

Her election as successor of her half-sister, Magalena, took place in Liège where the 13 canonesses and 3 canons had fleed for the plauge. She accepted 21 articles set up by the ladies of the chapter to limit her powers, and the situation was still insecure because of wars and epedemics. She was daughter of Gottfried, Herr zu Üttingen, Wolmeringen, Ennery, Clervaux und Kumeringen and Elizabeth de Heu, and lived (1581-1641).



1636-63 Princess-Abbess Maria Scholastica Erberhard of Heggbach (Germany)

Elected Abbess by the ladies of the chapter in exile in Feldbach in Thurgau, where they had fled for the Swedes. But they soon returned and continued their life in the territory. 1644 she wrote to Emperor Ferdinand III asking for a moratorium against the creditors, this was granted and the depths were cancelled, but still the finances remained limited and it took years to rebuild the convent.


 

1636-39 Reigning Abbess-General Magdalena Enríquez Manrique de Ayala of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

The various branches of the Mandrique family held many Duchal and Countly titles.

 

1636-41 Reigning Abbess Gertrud Giel von Gielsberg of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

The whole complex was almost totally destroyed during the 30 Year War (1618-48). She was daughter of Jörg Christoph Giel von Gielsberg and Anna Katharina von Bernhausen from Swabia.


Jeanne-Baptiste de Bourbon

1637-70 Reigning Abbess Jeanne-Baptiste de Bourbon of the Royal Abbey of Fontevraud (France)

At the age of 10 she entered the Abbey of Chelles and Louise de Bourbon-Lavedan appointed her as coadjutrice at the age of 16, but she did not take over the position until she was 25. She reigned with absolute "souverainty" and her direct dependence on the Pope in Rome allowed her to act autonomously from the church in France.  In 1641 she obtained royal letters confirming the reform and finally quashing the claims of the monks, who sought to organize themselves independently of the authority of the abbess. The following year the Rule approved by Sixtus IV was printed at Paris, but in 1658, the Sacred Congregation of Rites categorically condemned that she of her own authority, obliged the monks and nuns of her obedience to recite offices, say Masses, and observe rites and ceremonies which had never been sanctioned or approved of by Rome. She was the legitimized daughter of king Henri IV and Charlotte des Essarts, and her full sister; Marie Henriette de Bourbon (1609-29) was Abbess of Chelles. She lived (1608-70).


 

1638-52 Princess-Abbess Maria von Ramschwag of Schänis (Switzerland)

In her role as Kollatorin - her right to appoint the local clergy, she confirmed the earlier decisions taken about the church of Amden in 1642 and had to flee for the Sweds in 1647. She was daughter of Kasper von Ramschwag, Steward of Gutenberg and Sophia von Kippenheim, and lived (1579-1652).


 

1638-44 Abbess Nullius Barbara Tarsi of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

As every newly appointed Abbess of Conversano, she received public "homage" of her clergy after her appointment, - the ceremony of which was sufficiently elaborate. The clergy, in a body repaired to the abbey; at the great gate of her monastery, the Abbess, with mitre and corsier, sat enthroned under a canopy, and as each member of the clergy passed before her, he made his obeisance, and kissed her hand.


 

1638-55 Reigning Abbess Marguerite de la Trémoille of the Royal Abbey of Jouarre (France)

Former Coadjutrice and Abbess of another chapter. She continued the work of reform striving to revive a real "spirit of community" re-establishing, enclosure, poverty, silence, as well as morning and evening meditation in the monastery now numbering 120 religious.


 

1640-49 Princess-Abbess Sedonia von Oldenburg-Delmenhorst of Herford (Germany)

Also known as Sidonie, she joined the representative of the city in the protests against Brandenburg's occupation of the City during the 30 Years War, but the troops stayed. She resigned in 1649 and married Duke August Philip von Schleswig-Holstein-Sønderborg-Beck (1612-27-75), whose second wife was Marie Sibylle von Nassau-Saarbrücken und Ottweiler (1628-99). Sedonia was daughter of Anton II von Oldenburg-Delmenhorst and Sibylle Elisabeth von Braunschweig-Danneberg, and her sister, Katherine Elisabeth, was sovereign of Gandersheim (1625-49). She lived (1611-50). 


1640-57 Princess-Abbess Maria Johanna von Kollonitsch of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
Her family originally came from Croatia and moved to Austria in the 15th century and were given a Countly title, held high offices in the army or in the church. She was a great promoter of the chapter and it's art, which is still famous.

 

1641-86 Princess-Abbess Isabella Henrietta d'Aspremont-Lynden of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)

received papal dispence because she was under 30 when elected amidst protest from her opponent, the Dechaness Anna Louise van Berlo. The chapter had survived the Thirty Years War, but towards the end it was occupied by the unemployed troops of Duke Karl  of Lorraine in 1656. After the death of her brother, Count Ferdinand van Aspremont-Lynden in 1665, she was named guardian for his 16 children together with Prince-Bishop Frans Egon von Furstenberg of Liege, the brother of her sister-in-law, Elisabeth von Fürstenberg-Heiligenberg. The county can be passed down both in the male and in the female line. In 1671 the troops of King Louis XIV of France passed through the territory, making life difficult and several ladies left the chapter. The Dechaness stayed in Liège 1677-79, but after her return the old disputed was revived. She used the title of Isabelle Henriette, by the Grace of God, lady and Abbess, Sovereign Lady, Princesse-Abbesse (gefürste Abtissine" amidst protests from Liège. She was daughter of Ernst d'Aspremont and Anna de Gouffier, and lived (1615-86).


 

1641-44 Reigning Abbess-General Francisca de Beaumont de Navarra of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Her family decended the French, Navarrarese and Argonese royal families through the marriage of Luis de Beaumont, Count de Lerín and Juana de Navarra, señora de Sada y Eslava, natural daughter of King Carlos III de Navarra, King Felipe IV confirmed the rights of the scribes of the monastery to act as magistrates (judges) in 1643.

 

1641-44 Reigning Abbess Isabelle III de Héricourt of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Appointed as Abbess by King Felipe IV of Spain, who as Count of Flanders and Artois, was head of the Southern Low Countries, after the canoness had been unable to elect as successor to Marie IV for 6 months.


 

1641-60 Reigning Abbess Maria Margarethe Schenk von Castell of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

Mentioned as Prioress in 1638. It is not known if she received the customary homage by the inhabitants of Wald and the other territories in 1641 or not until 1651 because of the continued warfare. She was daughter of Hans Maz Schenk von Castell zu Gattburg and Eva Blarer von Wartensee zu Wartegg.


 

Around 1643 Princess-Abbess Henrica Raitz von Frentz of Burtscheid (Germany)

The first member of the family started her reign in 1618, but it is not known for how long and when Henrica took over the reigns of the state. But in 1643 she built the Monnikenhof in the Chapter. Next abbess is mentioned in 1649.


 

1643-53 Abbess Nullius Girolama Indelli of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

In the alternative list of Abbesses her reign ends 1644.


 

1643-62 Reigning Abbess Anne de L'Hôpital of Montvilliers

Daughter of François, Count de L'Hôpital and Rosnay and Charlotte des Essarts, the Maitresse of King Henri. Possibly succeeded by Marguerite de Gonzague. She (d. 1662).


 

1644-53 Princess-Abbess Barbara I Weglin of Baindt (Germany)

Around 1649 the ladies of the chapter resumed the life in the convent after the lootings during the Thirtieth Year War.


 

1644-45 Reigning Abbess-General Ana María de Salinas of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Died within the first year of her three-year election period.

 

1645-48 Reigning Abbess-General Jerónima de Navarra y de la Cueva of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Member of a side-line of the former royal house of Navarra.

Fürstäbtissin Anna Sophie I zu Quedlinburg

1645-80 Princess-Abbess Anna Sophie I von der Pfalz-Zweibrücken und Birkenfeld of Quedlinburg (Germany)

Daughter of Pfalzgraf Georg Wilhelm von der Pfalz-Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld, Pfalzgraf bei Rhein and Gräfin Dorothea von Solms-Sonnenwalde. She lived (1619-80).

 

1645-74 Princess-Abbess Maria Sophie zu Salm-Reifferscheid of Elten, Abbess of Vreden (Germany)

Considered the second founder as she started rebuilding the chapter, a small Catholic Territory partly in Germany, partly within the Protestant Netherlands. 1664 she asked the Pope for confirmation and expansion of her ecclesiastical rights, using the example of her colleague in Essen, noting that her predecessors since ancient times had exercised episcopal authority leaving only the right to confirm the election of a new Abbess to the Bishop of Utrecht. The Papal Nuntius in Kölln recommended that the Pope confirmed her quasi-episcopal powers and that she appointed a General Vicar as her temporal substitute. The pope granted her theise rights in 1669 and confirmed them in 1675. In 1669 she founded a fond in the "Princely and Imperial Free Chapter of Elten" and the "High Countly" to Vreden in favour of young women of her family in both male and female line Daughter of Count Ernst Friedrich zu Salm-Reifferscheid in Bedburg and Countess Maria Ursula zu Leiningen Her sister, Anna Salome, was sovereign of Essen, and lived lived (1620-74).


 

1645-63 Reigning Abbess Catherine de Beauffremez of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

At her election, the Prior, the Chaplaine, the Treasurer, the lady of the refectory, the Matron of the novices, 2 ladies of the sacritsty, 2 canonesses and 6 other ladies, whose occupation is not mentioned, took part. She was daughter of Lord d'Esnes and Haily. The Abbey became part of France 1659.


Reichsfürstin  Anna-Salome I of  Essen

1646-88 Princess-Abbess Anna-Salome I von Salm-Reiffenscheidt of Essen, Lady of Bresig etc. (Germany)

1640-74 she was also Dechantess of Thorn and Lady of the Chapter (Stiftfrau) in Elten and St. Ursula (Köln). She was able to assert the princely sovereignty against the protestant city, and thereby secured the continued existence of the Damenstift (Ladies Chapter). Since 1661 she used the title "Des heiligen römischen Reiches Fürstin und Äbtissin in Essen, Frau zu Breisig, Huckard und Rellinghausen" (Princess and Abbess of the Holy Roman Realm of Essen, Lady of Breisig etc). Daughter of Count Ernst Friedrich von Salm-Reifferscheid in Bedburg and Countess Maria Ursula zu Leiningen. One sister, Maria Sophie, reigned as Fürstäbtissin of Elten another, Anna Katharina of Thorn. A fourth, Sidonia Elisabeth, was Lady of the Chapter in Thorn, Essen and St. Ursula before she married Hartmann Fürst von und zu Liechtenstein in 1640, and became mother of 24 children. Anna Salome lived (1622-88).


Anna Catharina zu Salm-Reiffenscheidt

1646-47 Princess-Abbess Anna Catharina zu Salm-Reiffenscheidt of Thorn (The Netherlands)

Resigned in order to marry Count Johann IV von Rietberg, and after his death she was regent 1660-68 for son Friedrich Wilhelm (1650-77) who fell by Straßburg, and was succeeded by his brothers Franz Adolph Wilhelm, (1677-80) and ( 1687-88) and Ferdinand Maximilian (1680-1687), who were both Diachons and Domherrs of the Cathedral Straßburg, and Anna Catharina remained the virtual ruler of the territory. Ferdinand Maximilian was succeeded by his niece, Maria Ernestine Franziska. Anna Catharina's older sister, Maria Sophie (1620-74) was Abbess in Elten and the other Anna Salome (1622-88) in Elten. They were daughters of Altgraf Ernst Friedrich, (1583-1639) and Countess Maria Ursula zu Leiningen (†1649). Anna Catharina's daughter, Bernhardine Sophia was Fürstäbtissin of Essen 1691-1726. Anna Katharina lived (1624-91).

Gräfin Anna Salomé von Manderscheid-Blankenheim, Fürstäbtissin von Thorn und Essen

1647-90 Princess-Abbess Anna Salomé von Manderscheid-Blankenheim of Thorn, Lady of Thorn, Ittervoort, Grathem, Baexem, Stramproy, Ell, Haler and Molenbeerse (The Netherlands)
1689-91
Princess-Abbess Anna-Salome II of Essen, Lady of Breisig, Huckard and Rellinghausen (Germany)

Had to raise taxes in the principality because of the ongoing wars, and worked closely together with her sister, Clara Elisabeth, who was her second-in-command. In 1688 Anna-Salome was elected Fürstäbtissin of Essen. She was daughter of Ernst Friedrich von Manderscheid-Blankenheim and Maria Ursula zu Leiningen. Her sister, Marie Sofie (1620-74), was Abbess in Eltern. Anna Salomé and lived (1622-91).


Around 1648 Princess-Abbess Justina Anna Etlin von Rosenfels of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
Ferdinand von Habsburg of Austria-Hungary, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire gave the "Abbtissin des Stiffts bey St. Georgen auf dem königl. Schloß zu Prag" dispensation from the war-tax because of the disasterous economic situation of the chapter.

 

1648-57 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth II d'Alençon of Remiremont (France)

Elisabeth-Marguerite d'Orléans, Mademoiselle d'Alençon was 2 years old when she was elected as sovereign of the chapter, and therefore her parents, Gaston Jean Baptiste de France, Duke d'Anjou, d'Orléans, Chartres, Valois, d'Alençon, comte de Blois, Monthéry et de Limours, baron d'Amboise, seigneur de Montargi and Marguerite de Lorraine, reigned for her. In 1657 Elisabeth-Marguerite left the Abbey and married Duke Louis Joseph de Guise (1650-71) with whom she had one child François Joseph de Guise (1670-75). The former Princess-Abbess lived (1646-96).


 

1648-51 and 1656-59 Reigning Abbess-General Jerónima de Góngora of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Apart from her role as head of the congregation constisting of the monastaries of  Torquemada, Gradefes, Carrizo, Perales, San Andrés de Arroyo, Santa Maria de Otero, Cañas y Fuencaliente, Villamayor de los Montes, Renuncio, Barría y Avia and Vileña, she was also Head of the dependent parishes of Bercial and Lorilla.

 

1649-67 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth Louise Juliane von der Pfalz-Zweibrücken of Herford (Germany)

The Countess Palantine was daughter of Johann II, Pfalzgraf von Zweibrücken and Luise Juliane von Simmeren, and lived (1613-67).


 

1649-83 Princess-Abbess Maria-Elisabeth von Salis of Obermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

Member of a Swiss noble family.


 

Around 1649 Princess-Abbess and Steward Baroness Raitz von Frentz of Burtscheid (Germany)

Apparently the Freiin (Baroness), whose first name is not known, was elected, as the successor of Fürstäbtissin Henrica, who was mentioned in 1643, but of whom not much more is known. The last of the baronial (Freiherrliche) family of Raitz von Frentz to govern the territory was in office until 1669.


 

1649 Abbess Nullius Antonia Acquavia d'Aragona of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Listed in an alternative list of Abbesses of the chapter. Sister of the Abbesses Donata and Mariana - all daughters of the Count and Countess Caterina  Acquavia d'Aragona and Giulio Acquavia d'Aragona of Conversano.


 

1650-65 Princess-Abbess Maria Sabina zu Solms-Lich of Gandersheim (Germany)

Since her predecessor, Fürstäbtissin Katharina Elisabeth did not reside in the chapter, she had to promise to stay there in order to get elected. Daughter of Count Ernst II zu Solms-Lich and Countess Anna von Mansfeld, she lived (1600-65).


 

1650-69 Princess-Abbess Maria-Franziska I von Montfort of Buchau (Germany)

Before she became Canoness she was probably Lady-in-waiting to Archduchess Claudia von Tirol. Soon after her election she began rebuilding the chapter and bring the economic situation back on track. She managed to retrieve the "treasure of the church". When she became seriously ill the College of the Counts of Swabia tried to influence the election of her sucessor. Listed among the Secular Princes of the Swabian Circle in 1650 and 1669 and she signed a decision of the Imperial Diet (Reichstagsabscheid) in 1664. She used the title of "Reverend and Illustrius Lady, Princess Abbess of the Holy Roman Empire of Buchau, nee Countess of Montfort, and was daughter of Count Hugo von Montfort, Councillor of the Bavarian-Palatinate and Imperial Council and Chamber, and Euphrosina Truchsess von Waldburg-Wolfegg, and lived (circa 1622-69).


 

1651-53 and 1656-59 Reigning Abbess-General Isabel de Osorio y Leyva of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Member of the family of Counts of Trastamara and Marqueses of Astorga.

 

1652-64 Princess-Abbess Maria Caecilia von Greuth of Schänis (Switzerland)

The bishop leter know that she had to use the Court of the Diocese in court cases. A relative of hers, Agnes III, was Fürstäbtissin of Säckingen 1621-58. Maria Caecilia was daughter of Hugo Theodorich von Greuth, of Klingenau, and Apollonia von Altendorp.


Fürstäbtissin Maria Margaretha von Sigertshofen

1652-75 Princess-Abbess Maria Margarethe von Sigertshofen of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

Member of a family of Lords of a territory in Schwaben in Germany.


 

1653-72 Princess-Abbess Maria-Scholastica Klocker of Baindt (Germany)

As Fürstäbtissin she was a member of the Bench of Prelates of the Swabian Circle Estate (Reichskreisstandschaft), the regional assembly of the Schwäbischer Kreis, and as Imperial Prelate she held a vote in the College of the Prelates of Swabia, whose 22 members (Abbesses and Abbots) had a joint vote in the Council of the Princes of the Imperial Diet, where the representative of the Prelates sat on the Ecclesiastical Bench. The Diet of Regensburg in 1663 prolonged itself indefinitely into permanent session and thereafter was called the Regensburg Diet, or the Everlasting Diet (Immerwährender Reichstag).


 

1653-56 Reigning Abbess-General Antonia Jacinta de Navarra y de la Cueva of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Daughter of Duke Felipe of Navarre de la Cueva y de Salazar and Mariana de Mendoza. Her grandfather was Pedro batard de Navarra, whose sister Isabel was Abbess from 1665. Antonia Jacinta became a nun at Las Huelgas and was later elected abbess. When she pronounced her vows, she asked Jesus as a wedding gift that he led her through sorrows and adversity. She found both in abundance, suffering from illness and spiritual anxieties. She is said to have received the stigmata. Later declared venerable - which is the title of a person who has been posthumously declared venerable -"heroic in virtue" - during the investigation and process leading to canonization as a saint. She lived (1602-56).

 

1653-65 Abbess Nullius Cesaria Indelli of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

In the alternative list of Abbesses her first reign ends 1656 and the second lasted 1660-62.


 

1654-68 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth IV d'Oyenbrugge of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles  (Belgium)

Her surname was also spelled d'Oyenbrughe.


 

1655-59 Princess-Abbess Johannetta Stephana von der Hees of Keppel (Germany)

According to the Westphalian Peace, which followed the Thirty Years War, the ecclesiastical territories, chapters and convents should revert to the situation prior to 1624. And at that time the convent was protestant but two years later Prince Johann of Nassau reintroduced Catholism, and therefore it was decided that Keppel should be a double-denomination chapter (stift), and the post of Abbess should alternate between Protestants and Catholics. Johanetta therefore succeeded the Protestant Maria von Effern. She resigned from the convent in order to marry, and was succeeded by another protestant.


Abbesse Henriette II of ouarre 

1655-92 Reigning Abbess Henriette II de Guise of the Royal Abbey of Jouarre (France)

Also known as Henriette de Lorraine, she was niece of Jehanne and during her reign, the Abbey became powerful, because of privilege of exemption, acquired in the 13th century. However this Abbess, too sure of her prerogatives, had disputes and a lawsuit with Bossuet, the bishop of Meaux. The "Eagle of Meaux", as he was known, interfered violently. Henriette lost the case and resigned. However, Bossuet could be gentle too as his letters to the nuns testify. He wrote to them in 1695: "God loves Jouarre". Daughter of Claude de Lorraine, Duc de Chevreuse, Prince de Joinville and Marie Aimée de Rohan, Mademoiselle de Montbazon. Her oldest sister was, Anne Marie, Abbess of Pont-aux-Dames, and she lived (1631-93).


1657-87 Princess-Abbess Ursula Scherlin of Rottenmünster (Germany)

The territory had been virtually abandoned during the Thirty Years War and the convent was severely damaged by the many passing troops that had made camp in the city of Rottweiler, the convent was put on fire, looted etc. Ursula started the rebuilding in 1662 and managed to bring the territory back in working condition.


1657-95 Princess-Abbess Maria Benedicta Schrattenbach of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
In an official document from 1660, she is named as Frau Maria Benedicta, Äbtissin des fürstlichen Stiftes Göss, geborener Gräfin von Schwarzenpach and in the Topograhy of the Duchy of Steiermark from 1681, the entry about the chapter is called "Das Hoch Adeliche Iungfraw Closter Göss.

 

1657-60 Princesse-Abbesse Marie-Anne of Lorraine of Remiremont, Dame of Saint Pierre and Metz etc. (France)

The princess was elected Abbess at the age of 11, she was daughter of Nicolas François, who resigned as Cardinal in 1634 to become Duke of Lorraine (1634-61), and Claude de Lorraine (1612-1648). She lived (1648-61).


 

1658-72 Princess-Abbess Francisca von Schauenburg of Säckingen (Germany)

Her reign marked a period of rebuilding after the devastations of the Thirty Year War. She was daughter of Hans Bernhard von Schauenburg, of the Luxembourg Line, and Elisabeth von Schönau, and lived (1588-1672).


 

1658-70 Abbess Nullius Marianna Acquavia d'Aragona of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

In the alternative list, she is listed as ruler 165..-56 and 1671-72 and 1675. She was daughter of the Count of Countess of Conversano, Giulio Acquaviva d' Aragona, 2nd Duke di Noci and Caterina Acquaviva d' Aragona, 6th duchessa di Nardò. Her sister-in-law, Isabella Filomarino, was regent of the County 1655-65.


 

1659-63 Princess-Abbess Eleonora Theodora Vogtin von Elspe of Keppel (Germany)

She was a Protestant and like her Catholic predecessor, she resigned in order to enter into a marriage.


 

1660-1702 Princesse-Abbesse Dorothée Marie de Salm of Remiremont, Dame de Saint-Pierre, Metz etc.  (France)

The princess was elected Coadjutrice with the right of succession as a child, and when Marie-Anne died, she was elected Abbess. 1677 she moved to the chateau of some relatives, Neuviller-sur-Moselle, 3 days of travelling from Remiremont, where she took up the fight for her position against the Administratrice, Bernarde de Cléron de Saffre, The territory was hit by an earthquake in 1688. 1691 she travelled to Paris to plead her case before the king and the ladies of the chapter send Madame de Bourdonné as their envoy. 1693 the king confirmed the seigniorial rights over the town of Remiremont and continued to share the rights of high, middle and low court with the town. Originally named Dorothea Maria zu Salm, she was daughter of Prince Leopold Philipp Karl zu Salm and Countess Maria Anna von Bronckhorst-Batenburg, Heiress of Anholt, who died in Remiremont in 1661, her sister Maria Christina, was canoniss of the chapter. Dorothée Marie lived (1651-1702)


 

1660-66 Joint Administratrice Hélène d'Anglure of Remiremont, Dame de Saint-Pierre, Metz etc.  (France)

As Dame Doyenne she was Second-in-Command. She protested against the election of Dorothée de Salm as Abbess, since she was below the required age of 25 at the age of her election, but the Pope dispended for the rule, and she became Acting Princess-Abbess of the Chapter, but remained in dispute with Dorothée after she came of age until her own death. (d. 1666).


 

1660-77 Joint Administratrice Bernarde de Cléron de Saffre of Remiremont, Dame de Saint-Pierre, Metz etc.  (France)

Held the office of Dame Sonière and held as adminsitrator together with the Dame Doyenne, Hélène d'Anglure, for the under-age Princess-Abbess Dorothée de Salm. After she was elected as Madame d'Anglure's successor she continued the powerstruggle with the Abbess, who named her sister, Christine, as  "Second-in-Command" in 1702 and it was her who acted as Regent for the minor Elisabeth Charlotte Gabrielle Lorraine from 1700 and 11 years onwards, not Bernarde. (d. after 1704)


 

1660-81 Reigning Abbess Maria Salome von Bernhausen of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

Mentioned as Oberbursiererin in 1639. In 1680 the main building of the chapter burnt down. She was related to a large number of the canonisses and was daughter of Hans Wilhelm von Bernhausen zu Eppishausen und Moos and Margarethe Blarer von Wartensee. She lived (1593-1681).


Around 1661 Princess-Abbess Maria Benedicta von Schwarzenbach of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
In an official document, she is named as Frau Maria Benedicta, Äbtissin des fürstlichen Stiftes Göss, geborener Gräfin von Schwarzenpach

 

1662-65 and 1677-80 Reigning Abbess-General Inés de Mendoza y Miño of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

A relative (probably her sister), Magdalena, was elected Señora Abadesa of Las Huelgas twice; 1669-72 and 1680-83.

 

1663-70 Princess-Abbess Maria Appolonia Schweizer of Heggbach (Germany)

She continued the building activities and at the same time paid back substantial parts of the chapter's depths. Born in Ulm, she lived (1604-70).


 

1663-96 Princess-Abbess Franziska von Freyberg of Gutenzell (Germany)

As a Swabian Fiefholder, she exercised the High Court-right of the Marshalate of Swabia from 1685.


 

1663-85 Princess-Abbess Johanna Maria von Holdinghausen of Keppel (Germany)

Joined the Chapter in 1655, and 11 years later she became Catholic.


 

1664-77 Princess-Abbess Maria Franzisca zu Rhein of Schänis (Switzerland)

One of her relatives, Johann Jakob zu Rhein von Morschwiller (1643-90), was Domherr and Scholasticus of the Prince Bishop of Basel, where her family had been influential since the 12th century. The next of her family to reign the territory took office in 1701. She was daugher of Lorenz zu Rhein, of a Ministerial family (Civil Servant Nobility), and Maria Agnes von Rosenbach.


 

1665-78 Princess-Abbess Dorothea Hedwig zu Slesvig-Holsten-Nordburg of Gandersheim (Germany)

Her full title was Heiress to Norway, Duchess of Slesvig, Holstein, Stormarn and Ditmarsken, Countess of Oldenborg and Delmenhorst, and she had been Dechaness since 1652 and lived a very free life for a Fürstäbtissin. Converted to Catholisism and married Count Christof von Rantzau-Hohenfeld (1625-96), and Pope Innocentius XI sent a personal congratulation on occasion of their wedding. After some years she went on a a journey to Vienna, where she paid her respect to Emperor Leopold. In Rome she moves in the circles of her far away cousin the ex-queen Christina of Sweden. In 1681 she gives birth to a son, Alexander Leopold Anthon, whose  sponsors are queen Christina of Sweden, the German Emperor Leopold and her brother-in-law, Duke Anton Ulrich of Braunswieg. Returned to Schleswig in 1682. She was daughter of Duke Friedrich of Norborg and his second wife Eleonore von Anhalt-Zerbst, and lived (1636-92).

 

1665-69 and 1672-77 Reigning Abbess-General Isabel María de Navarra y de la Cueva of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Daughter of Don Pedro batard de Navarra and his mistress Beatriz Morales and granddaughter of Pedro II de Navarra, 3. Vizconde de Muruzábal de Andión. Her aunt, Jeronima de Navarra, succeeded her father in 1556 as 2nd Marquesa de Cortes, 7th Vizcondesa de Muruzábal de Andión. She was married twice but had no children. Another aunt was Antonia Jacinta, who had been Señora Abadesa of Las Huelgas 1653-56.

 

1666-77 Administratrice Bernarde de Cléron de Saffre of Remiremont (France)
1666-84-1704-? Dame Doyenne

Elected Dame Doyenne in succession Hélène d'Anglure and was Adminsitrator of the Chapter for the under-age Princess-Abbess Dorothée de Salm, and continued the power struggle with her, and had her sister, Christine named as "Second-in-Command" in 1700 and it was she who acted as Regent for the minor Elisabeth Charlotte Gabrielle Lorraine from 1700 and 11 years onwards, not Bernarde.

Elisabeth von der Pfalz

1667-80 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth III von der Pfalz of Herford (Germany)

The Pfalzgräfin was daughter of Elector Friederich V von der Pfalz and King of Bohemia (The Winter-king) and Elizabeth Stuart. She was in close contact with many of the philosophers and scientists of the day. In 1661 was she elected Coadjutorin of the Abbess of the "reichsunmittelbaren" chapter (Imperial Immediate Territory) for Noble ladies and in 1667 she was elected as Princess-Abbess. She gave freedom of faith and shelter to a number of protestant churches, which were not allowed elsewhere - among others the Quaker. Her sister, Sophia von Hanover, was named Heiress to the British throne in 1701. Elizabeth lived (1618-80).


Unnamed Abbess of Nivelles in the 17th century

1668-1705 Princess-Abbess Madeleine-Thérèse de Noyelle of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles (Belgium)

She was the second of the de Noyelle-family to rule the territory. The first, Marguerite V was in office 1561-69. 


 

Until 1669 Princess-Abbess Freiherrin Raitz von Frentz of Burtscheid (Germany)

The last of four members of the family who reigned the territory from 1618. And like it is the case is with her predecessor her first name is not known.


 

1669-72 and 1680-83 Reigning Abbess-General Magdalena de Mendoza y Miño of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

A relative (probably her sister), Inés, was elected Señora Abadesa of Las Huelgas twice; 1662-65 and 1677-80.

 

1669-92 Princess-Abbess Maria Theresia I von Sulz of Buchau, Lady of Strassberg (Germany)

After her election she was "hailed" by the inhabitants of Strassberg (Erbhüldigung) and later her other subjects "hailed" her. After her inaguration, she stressed her right to appoint the Priest of the Chapter against the Bishop of Konstanz and she tried to attempted to reintroduce serfdom in Strassberg. She was listed among the Secular Princes of the Swabian Circle in 1672, 1675, 1690 and 1692. She left the College of the Counts of the Realm (Reichgrafen) because of there ever tronger attepmts to interfeer in the internal affairs of the chapter. The chater never fully recovered from the devestations during the Thirty Years War and had sell a number of lordships and take up heavy lones to survive. She was daughter of tje Aistroam Ludwig Ernst, Count von Sulz and Landgrave im Klettgau and Countess Maria Elisabeth von Hohenzollern, and lived (1634-92).


 

1670-75 Princess-Abbess Maria Bernarda Östringer of Heggbach (Germany)

Continued the building and renovation works of her predecessor, but marked by illness during the whole of her short reign. She lived (1650-75).


1670-1704 Reigning Abbess Gabrielle de Rochechouart de Mortemart of the Royal Abbey of Fontevraud (France)

Marie-Madeleine-Gabrielle was the sister of the Marquise de Montespan, she is said to have translated all the works of Plato from the Latin version of Ficino. The children of the highest nobility frequented the abbey school, and her successors were entrusted with the education of the daughters of Louis XV.


 

1670/71 Abbess Nullius Faustina Sforza of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

In the alternative list of Abbesses she is listed as ruler 1663-70, 1675 and 1683.


 

1671-75 Abbess Nullius Maria Acquavia d'Aragona of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Member of the family that ruled Conversano and a number of other territories in Italy.


 

1672-88 Princess-Abbess Barbara II Sauther of Baindt (Germany)

As Princess of The Empire (Fürstäbtissin or Reichsäbtissin), she had a vote in the College of Prelates of Swabia, which had one joint vote on the Ecclesiastical Bank in the Council of Princes in the Diet of the Holy Roman Empire. From 1663 the Diet sat indefinitely and became known as the Everlasting Diet (Immerwährender Reichstag). From now on emperor was represented by a prince of the empire as his commissioner; a jurist was appointed as Subcommissioner; and the elector of Mainz, Archchancellor of the empire, had charge of the business of the meetings of the Diet. This assembly of representatives without legislative power disappeared when the realm collapsed under Napoleon's attack in 1806.


 

1672-93 Princess-Abbess Maria Cleopha Schenkin von Castell of Säckingen (Germany)

Had to flee for the rench troops during the Dutch Wwar in 1678. Säckingen was looted and a large part of the city burned down, including the church. Ten years later the territory was again attacked during the War of the Palatine (Pfälzischen Krieg) and she moved her residence to Etzgen. She was an able financial administrator and defended the seignorial rights of the chapter in Hornussen and Stein in Switzerland and ended disputes with the Lord of Grandmont over the rights within the Lordship of Laufenburg. Daughter of Ulrich Christoph Schenk von Castell and Maria Cleophe von Wolfurt. Various male members of her family were Prince-Bishops of Eichstätt. She lived (1639-93).


 

1672-88 Reigning Abbess Catherine II de Bernemiscourt of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Since the chapter was under the direct protection of the Pope, he or his personal representative was the only one who could conduct visitations to the chapter (control visits).


 

1675-87 Princess-Abbess Maria Cäcilia I Vöhlerin of Heggbach (Germany)

In 1686 she changed the common sleeping hall for the ladies of the chapter with cells for each one of them. During her reign the bad harvests returned (in 1682 and 1685), but she initiated a number of commercial activities and opened a mill and a saw. Another version of her surname was Vöhlin, and she was born Freifrau von Frickenhausen, Illertiseen und Neuburg.


Tombstone of a Fürstäbtissin of Niedermünster, but the name and year of her death have disappeared from the wear of the centuries

1675-93 Princess-Abbess Maria Theresia von Muggenthal of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

Member of the noble family of Counts of the Realm (Reichsgrafen) von Muggenthal in Bavaria.


Maria Franziska I von Elten

1675-1708 Princess-Abbess Maria Franziska I von Manderscheid of Elten, Abbess of Vreden (Germany)

After she had her election approved, she had her right to appoint and dismiss the clerics of the territory confirmed by the Pope, and she managed to curb the attempts by her General Vicar, who was her assistant in her exercise of her quasi episcopal authority, to become her superior. She founded convents and schools in the Catholic enclave partly on German, partly on Dutch ground. And in 1700 she issued a law which clearly divided the secular and clerical courts.


 

1675-95 Abbess Nullius Guiseppina Cedrella of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Alternative reign 1679-80.


 

1676-89 Princess-Abbess Maria Rosina Brümsi von Herblingen of Lindau (Germany)

The Abbess of Lindau became Princess of the Empire with the title of Princess-Abbess (Reichsäbtissin to Lindau) in the 15th Century.


 

1677-1701 Princess-Abbess Maria Eva Schenkin von Castell of Schänis (Switzerland)

Reached a compromise with the parish of Benken in the dispute over the right to appoint the local priest (Kollaturstreit. Her Cousin, Countess Maria Cleopha, was Princess-Abbess of Säckingen (1672-93). The daughter of Johann Erhard Schenk von Castell, Chief Steward of Delsberg and Maria Elisbeth von Rotberg, she lived (1640-1701).


1678-81 Princess-Abbess Christine Sofie zu Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel of Gandersheim (Germany)

Also known as Christina Sophie, she resigned in order to marry her cousin Duke August Wilhelm of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel (1662-1731), who did not have any children with his two next wives, Sophie Amalie von Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorf (1670–1710) and Elisabeth Sophie Marie von Schleswig-Holstein-Norburg (1683–1767), as he preferred men. She was daughter of Duke Rudolf August of Christiane Elisabeth, Gräfin von Barby, and lived (1654-95).


Elisabeth III von Herford 

1680-86 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth III Albertina von Anhalt-Dessau of Herford (Germany)

Her father, Duke Johann Georg II. von Anhalt-Dessau, had her elected as Reichsäbtissin in order to secure her an income and to influence the Herfordian part of vote in the Bank of Prelates of the Rhine. After she she resigned in order to marry Heinrich von Sachsen-Wissenfels-Barby, she brought a large number of artists and merchants with her to Barby. Of her 8 children, only Georg Albrecht reached adulthood (but had no heirs), 3 were still-born, 3 died as infants, one son at the age of 19. Her sister Johanna Charlotta was Princess-Abbess from 1729. Elisabeth Albertina lived (1665-1706). 


Fürstäbtissin Anna Sophie II zu Quedlinburg 

1680-83 Princess-Abbess Anna-Sophie II von Hessen-Darmstadt of Quedlinburg (Germany)

The Landgravine had been second in command of the Abbey-State since 1656 with the title of Pröpstin and Coadjutorin from 1678. Her sister, Elisabeth Amalie Magdalene, was married to the Catholic Count Philipp Wilhelm von der Pfalz-Neuburg and after she converted to this faith, she tried to persuade Anna-Sophia to do the same, but she remained a staunch protestant. 1658 she published the prayer book 'treue Seelenfreund Jesus Christus' (Faithful soulmate of Jesus Christus) with her own texts and songs. She was daughter of Landgrave Georg III von Hessen-Darmstadt, and lived (1638-83).


1681-93 Princess-Abbess Christine zu Mecklenburg-Schwerin of Gandersheim  (Germany)
The princess was the 16th child of Duke Adolf Friedrich I and the second daughter of his second wife, Marie Katharina von Braunschweig-Dannenberg. After her death, her, Marie Elisabeth, was elected as Fürstäbtissin and ruler of the Ecclesiastical territorial. Christine lived (1639-93).

 

1681-1709 Reigning Abbess Maria Jakobe von Bodman of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

Elected 6 April, confirmed by the Abbot of Salem at 5 August, received the customary homage by the inhabitants 25 January 1700 with participation of the Abbot, and was inagurated 29 June 1701. She rebuild the church of the chapter in baroque style. 2 of her sisters were nuns in Heiligenkreutz and Rottenmünster and her brother Johann Rupert Sigismund was Prince-Abbot of Kempten and another Prior in Hofen. She was related to several canonesses in Wald. She was daughter of Johann Siegmund von Bodman zu Wiechs und Steisslingen.


 

1683-86 Reigning Abbess-General Felipa Bernada Ramírez de Arellano of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

In spiritual matters she enjoyed an unique position as she was granted rights normally only granted to the male members of the Catholic hierarchy : she had the right to preach, say mass, hear confessions, nominate parish priests, etc.


 

1683-1719 Princess-Abbess Maria Theresia von Sandizell of Obermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

In charge of a territory that included the Hofmarks (Seigneurities) of Obertraublingen and Oberröhrenbac, the Provosties of Tegenheim, Sallbach, Mettenbach, Langenpreising, Grosshausen and Ottmaring and a member of farms all over Bavaria and circa 100 in the surroundings of Regensburg and also owned a substantial number of houses within the city. 1704 she started the modernization and rebuilding of the Church and the Abbey-buildings in Baroque style.


 

1683-84 Designate Princess-Abbess Anna Dorothea von Holstein-Gottorp of Quedlinburg (Germany)

Named as successor of Anna Sophie II von Hessen-Darmstadt, but Anna-Dorothea von Sachsen-Weimar , who had been named Pröbstin and promished the right of succession in 1681, protested and her cousin,  Johann Georg III of Saxony, helped Anna Dorothea von Sachsen to get elected Abbess in 1684, and the Saxon Princess recevied Imperial confirmation the following year. Anna Dorothea von Gottorf was daughter of Friedrich III of Schleswig-Holstein-Sønderborg-Gottorp (1616-59) and Marie Elisabeth zu Sachsen (1610-84), daughter of Elector Johann Georg I of Sachsen. She lived (1640-1713).

Fürstäbtissin Anna Dorothea zu Quedlinburg, née Herzogin von Sachsen-Weimar

1684-1704 Princess-Abbess Anna Dorothea von Sachsen-Weimar of Quedlinburg (Germany)

1681-84 she was Provost (Pröpstin) of the Chapter. When Anna Sophie II. died in 1683, Anna Dorothea von Holstein-Gottorp was named as her successor, but Anna Dorothea von Sachsen had her relative, Elector Johann Georg III of Saxony help her be elected Abbess in 1684. She was confirmed by Emperor Leopold I. the following year. 1698 the city was occupied by troops from Brandenburg, and the Elector of Sachsen sold the guardianship for 300.000 Taler to the Electorate of Brandenburg, which made her protest to the Emperor about the fact that she had not been consulted about the sale. She was daughter of Duke Johann Ernst of Sachsen-Weimar and Elisabeth zu Holstein-Sønderborg (1657-1704).


 

1685-91 Princess-Abbess Agathe Juliane von Steprodt of Keppel (Germany)

Since it had been re-opened in 1650 as double-domination chapter, it had been ruled by a succession of Protestant and Catholic Abbesses. She therefore succeeded the Catholic Johanna Maria von Holdinghausen.


 

Around 1685 Princess-Abbess Marie Cunégonde von Beroldingen of the Royal Abbey of Andlau (France)

In 1686 she made a treaty with Louis XIV who agreed to respect the freedom of the canonesses to chose their own abbess and confirmed her title as princesse d’empire, even though the Chapter was no longer part of the Holy Roman Empire since both France-Comté and Alsace/Alsass had been incorporated into France at the time.


 

1685 Abbess Nullius Gabriela Therami of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Listed as ruler in the alternative list of abbesses.


 

1686-88 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth IV zu Hessen-Kassel of Herford (Germany)

11th child of Wilhelm of Hessen-Kassel and Amalie Elisabeth von Hanau-Münsterberg, and lived (1634-88).


 

1686-1715 Princess-Abbess Anne Leonore d'Aspremont-Lynden of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)

She had been elected Coadjutrice in 1784 and therefore automatically succeeded her aunt, Isabella Hendrika d'Aspremont-Lynden, she was an ambitious and despotic woman, and used royal symbols in her seal and engaged in disputes with the Prince-Bishop of Liège, who forbade her to use the title of Princess and forbade the inhabitants in her territory to accept her as sovereign Lady. As a result she forbade them to pay taxes to the bishop and in 1713 she denied Austrian troops the right to collect supplies, and she also refused to accept the emperor's demand that she acknowledge the bishop as her overlord. During the Nine Year War 1688-97 and the War of the Spanish Succession 1702-13 several troops passed through the territory and brought hardship to the inhabitants, but this did not stop the internal infightings that followed the election as Lambertine de Renesse as successor of her faithful supporter Maria Anna van Elderen as Dechaness. In 1702 she had the Papal Nuntius excommunicate Lambertine, but this was reverted by the Pope. She was daughter of Count Ferdinand d'Aspremont-Lynden and Elisabeth von Fürstenberg-Heiligenberg. (d. 1715).


 

1686-89 and 1695-96 Reigning Abbess-General Melchora Bravo de Hoyos of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

A relative of hers (possibly her brother), Gabriel Rodríguez Bravo de Hoyos, was Governor of Nicaragua 1689-93. Other relatives were governors of Costa Rica and Mexico and other parts of the New World in South America.

 

1687-1700 Princess-Abbess Maria Barbara IV Hager of Heggbach (Germany)

In 1689 the major part of the chapter fled for the passing French troops led by General Mélac. But she managed to renovate church of the chapter in baroque style, even though it led to an economical crisis in the territory. During a number of years Prioress Maria Antonia Motz lead an internal opposition against her and she was forced to resign. (d. 1715).


1687-1725 Princess-Abbess Maria Williburg Frey of Rottenmünster (Germany)

She rebuilt the main building of the chapter.


 

1688-1722 Princess-Abbess Anna IX Tanner of Baindt (Germany)

In the year she was elected as head of the ecclesiastical territory, the ladies of the chapter fled the approaching French troops and sought refuge by the Bodenzee, but returned not long after.


 

1688-1728 Princess-Abbess Charlotte Sophia von Kurland of Herford (Germany)

The stewards of the City of Herford, the Electors Brandenburg, had occupied the city since 1647 and deprived it of its position of a City of the Realm, but in 1695 Elector Friederich III recognized this position for the Chapter of Herford and King Friederich I confirmed this in 1705. 1702 the Duchess send a messenger to King Karl XII of Sweden at the seige of Thorn in the Netherlands to get the money that her brother, Duke Ferdinand owed her. She was engaged in deep disputes with the other members of the Chapter and in 1703 she moved to the Chapter of Vreden, where she resided until her death. She was the youngest daughter of Jakob von Kettler, Duke of Courland and Livonia (Livland) (1640-82), and Luise Charlotte von Brandenburg (1617-76), she lived (1651-1728).


 

1688-89 Acting Princess-Abbess Maria Franziska Truchsess von Walburg-Trauchburg of Essen, Lady of Breisig, Huckard and Rellinghausen (Germany)

She had hoped to become Princess-Abbess in 1689 but was not a candidate in the elections that Anna Salome II won over Bernhardine Sophia von Ostfriesland. Maria Franziska was Pröbstin until her death in 1693.


 

1688-95 Reigning Abbess Marie-Anne d'Assigny of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Daughter of Lord Haghedoorne de Wasnes.


 

1689-1720 Princess-Abbess Maria-Magdalena von Hallwyl von Herblingen of Lindau (Germany)

Member of a member of Counts of the Realm (Reichsgraf), which originated in Aargau in Switzerland, but settled both in Germany and Sweden among others. 


 

1689-92 and 1696-98 Reigning Abbess-General Teresa Orense of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Exercised an unlimited secular authority over more than 60 lordships and villages, held her own courts, granted letters dismissorial for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests, within the limits of her abbatial jurisdiction, to hear confessions, to preach, and to engage in the cure of souls.

 

1690-1706 Princess-Abbess Eleonora Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rochefort of Thorn, Lady of Thorn, Ittervoort, Grathem, Baexem, Stramproy, Ell, Haler and Molenbeerse (The Netherlands)

Daughter of Ferdinand Karl von Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rochefort and Countess Anna Maria von Fürstenberg, and lived (1653- 1706).


Bernhardina-Sophia von Ostfrisland-Rietberg

1691-1726 Princess-Abbess Bernhardina Sophia von Ostfriesland und Rietberg of Essen (Germany)

Reigned her ecclesiastical small state, an independent enclave within Prussia, as a very confident sovereign, who advocated a doctrinarian absolutism, and limited the influence of the Estates. She also promoted the Order of the Contregatio Baetae Mariae Virginis. She was daughter of Johann IV, Count of Ostfriesland und Rietberg and Anna Catharina von Salm-Reifferscheid. Her niece, Maria Ernestine Franziska, was Sovereign Countess von Ostfriesland and Rietberg (1690-1758). Bernhardina Sophia lived (1654-1726).


Around 1691 Princess-Abbess Anna Mechtildis Schönwiesin von Eckstein of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
Emperor Leopold von Habsburg of Austria-Hungary, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire issued a decreee in 1691 allowing her, the "Abbtissin Bey S. Georgen auf (Vnserm) Schloß zu Prag" to rebuild a church that burned down in 1688.

 

1692-1717 Princess-Abbess Anna Elisabeth von der Hees of Keppel (Germany) 

A Catholic, she was elected as successor to the Protestant Agathe Juliane von Steprodt as head of the Chapter of Käppel that was founded around 1390. The abbess was Reichsfürstin and a one of the joint members of the Ecclesiastical Bank of the Diet of the Empire.


 

1692-93 Princess-Abbess Maria-Franziska II Truchsess von Zeil-Wurzach of Buchau (Germany)

The daughter of Johann Jakob von Zeil-Wurzach and Johanna von Wolckenstein-Trostburg, she was elected at 14.10.1692, proclaimed at 4.11 and confirmed by the bishop at 10.11, at a time when she was already 62 years old. She had been canoness in both Buchau, Essen and Sankt Ursula in Köln, since 1648. She did not participate in the election of her predecessor Maria-Theresia I, but excused herself. In 1673 she was refused when she wanted to take over her job in Buchau - in the meantime she had also become Deaconess in Essen - because all positions had already been filled, and the difficult financial situation in the Chapter did not permit any additional office-holders. She then stayed in Essen and became Archdeacon (Pröbstin), but was denied the right to run for the post of Fürstäbtissin there in 1689 because she was not member of a Swabian noble family. She lived (1630-93).


 

1692-95, 1701-04, 1707-10 and 1714-15 Reigning Abbess-General Ana Jerónima Guerrero y Contreras of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Re-elected as temporal and secular ruler of the territory 3 times.

 

1692-1721 Reigning Abbess Anne Marguerite de Rohan of Jouarre (France)

Daughter of Francois de Rohan, Comte de Rochefort, Prince de Soubise, Governor of Champagne, Berry and Brie and his scond wife Anne-Julie de Rohan-Chabot, Dame de Soubise, and lived (1664-1721).


 

1693-1742 Princess-Abbess Maria-Theresia II von Montfort of Buchau (Germany)

A former Lady of the Chapel of Essen, she was a master builder, and consolidated the position of the territory. She changed the liturgy of the service in her church and defended her own ecclesiastical position and head of the clergy of the Chapter against the Bishop of Konstanz. She was listed among the Worldly Princes and Stifts in the Swabian Circle - 1793, 1796, 1799 and also mentioned as the 12th ranking prelate. The daughter of Count Johann VIII von Montfort-Tettnang and Anna Katharina von Sulz, she lived (1663-1742).


 

1693-1718 Princess-Abbess Maria Regina von Ostein of Säckingen (Germany)

In spite of the high contributions that the chapter had to pay in the succession wars of the Palentine and Spanin, she continued the rebuilding of the church that had burned down in 1678. Daughter of Johann Jakob von Ostein, Councillor of the Prince-Bishop of Basel and Anna Maria von Kippenhem, and lived (1643-1718).


Fürstäbtissin Henriette CHristine von Gandersheim, geborene Herzogin zu Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel

1693-1713  Princess-Abbess Henriette Christine von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel of Gandersheim (Germany)

Resigned after having given birth to a child the year before, converted to the Catholic faith and became a nun in a convent in Roermond. She was daughter of Anton Ulrich von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel and Elisabeth Juliane von Holstein-Norburg, and lived (1669-1753).


 

1693-97 Princess-Abbess Regina Recordin von Rein und Hamberg of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

Elected as successor of Maria Theresia von Muggenthal. 


1695-1706 Princess-Abbess Katharina Benedicta von Stürgkh of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
The only Austrian chapter with the status of an Imperial Immediacy.

 

1695-99 Abbess Nullius Isabella Tommasa Acquavia d'Aragona of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Alternative rule until 1705.


 

1695-98 Reigning Abbess Marie-Françoise Adornes de Ronsele of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Daughter of the Lord of Ronsele.


1696-1718 Princess-Abbess Maria Viktoria Hochwind of Gutenzell (Germany)

As a Swabian Fiefholder, she exercised the High Court-right of the Marshallate of Swabia until 1717.


 

1697-1723 Princess-Abbess Johanna Franziska Sibylla von Muggenthal of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

Chosen as successor of Regina Recordin von Nein-Hamberg. 


 

1698-1701 and 1710-11 Reigning Abbess-General Ana Inés de Osio y Mendoza of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Temporal and secular leader of vast territories in Castilla and Léon.

 

1698-1742 Reigning Abbess Madeleine-Eugenie de Béthune des Placques of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

A large number of her relatives had been bishops and abbesses of various dioceses and institutions since around 1200. Succeeded by niece, Marie-Charlotte de Béthune, and lived (1696-1742).


 

1699-1711 Abbess Nullius Giacoma Palmieri of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

During her reign, the Regent of the County of Conversano was Dorotea Acquaviva d'Aragona, who administered the fief in the name of her postumously born son, Giulio Antonio Acquaviva during the years 1691-1710, after the death of her husband, Giulio Antonio Acquaviva d'Aragona, Duke of Nardò and Noci, Count of Castellana, Conversano and San Flaviano.


 

1700-12 Princess-Abbess Magdalena Sohler of Heggbach (Germany)

A forceful and energetic administrator and was engaged in various disputes with neighbouring nobles. The chapter was hit by heavy taxes during the War of the Spanish Succession and the continued passage thorough the territory of foreign troops. From around 1705 her epileptic attacks increased and she was unable to perform her duties.


 

1700-11 Princesse-Abbesse Elisabeth Charlotte Gabrielle de Lorraine of Remiremont (France)

Her father, Duke Léopold of Lorraine, tried to impose her as Coadjutrice with the right of succession. Princess-Abbess Dorothée asked the Professors at Sorbonne for advice, but they didn’t answer before her death 2 years later, so King Louis XIV imposed Élisabeth as sovereign of the territory. She lived (1700-11).


 

1701-11 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Susana zu Rhein of Schänis (Switzerland)

Received the Papal Nuntius, Vincenzo Bichi in the chapter in the last year of her reign. Two other members of her family were Fürstäbtissin of the territory, the first from 1664 and the second from 1735. She was daughter of Hans Wilhelm zu Rhein zu Mortzwiller and Beatrix Reich von Reichenstein.


 

1702-10 Administratrice Christine de Salm-Salm of Remiremont (France)

In 1684 her sister, Princess-Abbess Dorothée de Salm, had her named as Second-in-Command against the ancient tradition where the Doyenne was the Deputy to the Abbess, and named Secréte, the third-in-command, after the death of Anne de Malain de Lux by the Pope, but never-the-less the ladies of the chapter elected Elisabeth-Gabrielle-Françoise Rouxel de Médavy to the post, but Christina von Salm continued as her sister's de-facto deputy, and she was Acting Princess-Abbess during the minority of Élisabeth-Charlotte. She lived (1653-?).


Marie Aurora von Königsmarck of Quedlingburg

1704-18 Acting Princess-Abbess Marie Aurora von Königsmarck of Quedlinburg (Germany)

Her father, General Graf Konrad Christoph von Königsmarck, fell in battle and she went with her mother, the Swedish Baroness Maria Christina von Wrangel af Lindeberg, to Sweden. After her death in 1691 she lived with her sister in Hamburg. 1696-97 she was the mistress of Elector Friedrich August II of Sachsen. Afterwards she retired to Quedlinburg where she became second-in-command as Pröpstin, but lived in Berlin, Dresden and Hamburg. 1702 she went on a diplomatic mission to the Swedish army in Narwa. After the Peace of she retired to Quedlinburg and was the Acting Sovereign as no Princess-Abbess was elected. She was in dispute with the other ladies of the chapter, Dechaness Eleonora Sophie von Schwarzenburg and her sister Maria Magdalena and various attempts to reconciliate the three failed even though the King of Prussia and the Emperor intervened. She spoke various languages, was a virtuous player of Lute and Viola da Gamba, and composed various operas, lieder and cantata. She lived (1662-1728).


Unnamed Spanish Abbess

1704-07 and 1711-14 Reigning Abbess-General Teresa Josefa de Lanuza of the Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

The Abbess of the chapter had the right to hold her own courts, in civil and criminal cases, granted letters dismissorial for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests, within the limits of her abbatial jurisdiction, to hear confessions, to preach, and to engage in the cure of souls. She was privileged also to confirm Abbesses, to impose censures, and to convoke synod.

Abbess Louise-François de Rochechouart de Mortemart of the Royal Abbey of Fontevraud

1704-42 Reigning Abbess Louise-Françoise de Rochechouart of the Royal Abbey of Fontevraud (France)

Succeeded her aunt Gabrielle de Rochechouart de Mortemart.


1706-17 Princess-Abbess Anna Juliana Helene von Manderscheid-Blankenheim-Gerolstein of Thorn, Lady of Thorn, Ittervoort, Grathem, Baexem, Stramproy, Ell, Haler and Molenbeerse (The Netherlands)
1708-17 Princess-Abbess of Elten and Abbess of Vreden (Germany)

During her reign the principality ended it's long lasting disputes with the Republic of the Netherlands with a treaty in 1715, which defined the rights of the abbey and the Staten Generaal - the Dutch parliament. In Elten she was succeeded by Maria Eugenia von Manderscheid.


 

1706-24 Princess-Abbess Marie Françoise Josephine de Berghes of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles  (Belgium)

She was daughter of Philipp Franz, Prince de Berghes, Count de Grimberghe etc, who was Governor of Hainault and later of Brussels and Marie Jacqueline de Lalaing, Baroness de Gaesbeek, and lived (1678-1724).


1706-37 Princess-Abbess Maria Mechtildis Berchtold of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
Member of an Austrian Countly family.

1706-53 Princess and Abbess Marie Gertrude von Berlepsch of the Stift zu den Engeln in Prag (Chapel of Angels in Prague) in Austria-Hungary

After husband, Wilhelm Ludwig von Berlepsch (1639-76), died of the wounds he received by the siege of Philippsburg, she became responsible for her two sons, Sittich Herbold (1673-1712) and the posthumously born, Peter Philipp Josef (1676-1721). As she chose to have her second son baptised by an Evangelican priest in 1680, the Prince-Abbot of Fulda sieged her castle Eichenzell and fined her 200 gulden, but she refused to bow. The same year the Emperor took her under his protection and in 1684 she was named Hofmeisterin (Mistress of the Court) in the Court of the first wife of the Pfalzgraf Johann Wilhelm von Pfalz Neuburg, and after her death in 1689, Marie Gertrude continued in office as Oberhofmeisterin (Chief Mistress) by the first wife of the Pfalzgraf and Elector Karl Philipp nach Neuburg an der Donau. 1690 she was appointed Oberhofmeisterin of Marie Anna who married king Carlos II of Spain, and during her time in Spain, she had a decisive influence on the politics of the country and thereby also in the rest of Europe. She worked for the interests of Austria and was very influential when it came to appointment to important offices and became very rich. In 1695, the Emperor raised her and her sons to the positions of Counts of the Realm (Reichsgrafenstand), but in the meantime the opposition against the German influence on the Queen-Regent grew, and Marie Gertrude left Spain in 1700. She bought back the part of the Estate of Eichenzell that had been taken as security by the Abbot of Fulda in 1680, and in 1699, she bought the Lordship of the Realm of Mylendok (Reichsherrschaft), and lived her to her death. 1706 she became the first Abbess of the newly founded Ladies Chapel in Prague (englischen weltlichen Fräulein-Stift in der Neustadt Prag) and she was appointed Princess of the Empire (Reichsfürstenstand). Born as Wolf von Gudenberg, she lived (1654-1723).


 

1706-08 Abbess Nullius Onofria Tarsi of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Elected in the presence of Bishop of Monopoli.


 

1709-39 Reigning Abbess Maria Antonia Constantina Scholastika von Falkenstein of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

Built the large baroque chapter-complex in the years 1721–27. 5 of her sisters were nuns in Unterlinden in Colmer, 1 in Günterstal and 3 possibly in Alspach beiKeysersberg, her brother, Adalbert became Bishop of Csanád in Hungary, another was a cleric and the last married a former nun in Wald. She was daughter of Freiherr von Falkensten and Anna Franziska Ursula von Mercy, and lived (1666-1739).


 

1710-11 and 1718-20 Reigning Abbess-General Inés de Osio y Mendoza of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Her full title was "noble Lady, the superior, prelate, and lawful administratrix in spirituals and temporals of the royal abbey".

1710-38 Princesse-Abbesse Béatrice Hiéronyme de Lorraine-Lillebonne of Remiremont (France)

Known as the "Mademoiselle de Lillebonne", she had lived in the entourage of the Grand Dauphin at Versailles, before she was named coadjutrice in 1705-11. She was daughter of Charles IV de Lorraine and Béatrix de Cusance. She built a Hospital for the sick, poor and orphans, and  lived (1662-1738).


 

1711 Abbess Nullius Giuditta Pascale of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Listed in the alternative list of Abbesses. 1709 the ancient ceremony where the clergy paid public homage to the Abbess was modified and toned down.


 

1711-13 Princess-Abbess Maria Eva Rosa von Römerstal of Schänis (Switzerland)

1712 she fled from troops to Zürich into exile into the interior of Switzerland, and in the meantime Maria Anna Margaretha von Wessenberg acted as Regent. The daughter of Johann Wilhelm von Römerstal, Chief Forester of the Bishop of Basel, and Klara Margarethe von Reinach, and the French version of her name was Marie Eve Rose de Rombeveaux.


 

1712 Acting Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Margaretha von Wessenberg of Schänis (Switzerland)

As the only one to remain in the chapter when the Fürstäbtissin and the other canonisses fled from the troops from Zürich she acted as Stadtholder (Statthalterin) from May to August.


 

1712-42 Princess-Abbess Maria Cäcilia II Constanza Schmid of Heggbach (Germany)

She paid off most of the heavy depths of the chapter, but the production buildings were hit by lightening and all the stock burned down to the ground. She wrote to a large number of neighbouring convents - including Gutenzell and Buchau and received plenty of donations. 1713 Emperor Karl VI of Austria confirmed the privileges of the chapter, but the following year she wrote to the Abbesses of Baindt, Gutenzell and Rottenmünster threatening to withdraw from the College of Prelates of the Realm (Reichsprälatenkollegium) if it would bear only financial obligations and no advantages to stay member, and she continued the disputes with the cities and other inhabitants of the territory, because of the taxes imposed by the Realm, and she feared for her position as Princess of the Realm. At the time of her reign the territory covered around 50 square kilometres and 1.718 inhabitants. She lived (1671-1742).


Marie Elisabeth zu Mecklenburg, Fürstin und Äbtissin zu Gandersheim

1712-13 Princess-Abbess Marie Elisabeth zu Mecklenburg-Schwerin of Gandersheim  (Germany)

Was Regent of the Chapter of Rühn in Mecklenburg 1705-12 and held the office of Dechaness of Gandersheim before becoming its Sovereign. She was daughter of Duke Adolf Friedrich I and Marie Katharina von Braunschweig-Dannenberg (1616-1665). Her oldest sister, Sophie Agnes was Regent of Rühn 1654-94, another, Christine was Princess-Abbess of of Gandersheim 1681-93 and Juliane Sibylle was also Regent of Rühn 1695-1701. She lived (1646-1713).


Elisabeth Ernestine von Sachsen-Meiningen

1713-66 Princess-Abbess Elisabeth Ernestine Antonie zu Sachsen-Meiningen of Gandersheim (Germany)

During her reign the Chapter of the Realm (Reichsabtei), experienced a revival. She had set up her permanent residence in the Stift and used her funds on expanding the church and other institutions and she was a great sponsor of arts and science and baroque culture. She also collected a large library and built a number of baroque buildings. She defended the independence of the chapter against the interventions of the duke of Braunschweig and his use of "Our Chapter" or "Princely Chapter" stressing that Gandersheim was an "ancient Imperial Free Worldly Chapter." She was daughter of Duke Bernhard I of Saxe-Meiningen and his second wife Elisabeth Eleonore von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel, and lived (1681-1766).


 

1713-35 Princess-Abbess Maria Clara Salomé von Roggenbach of Schänis (Switzerland)

Because of a serious mental inless a Reigning Koadjutorin was installed 1722 until she resigned from office. The Daughter of Johann Franz von Roggenbach, of a noble Austrian family living in the Diocese of Basel, and Maria Jacobe Münch von Rosenberg. She lived (1668-1736).


1715-28 Princess-Abbess Lambertina Cécilia de Renesse d'Elderen of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)

After the death of her predecessor, Anna Leonora, she quickly took the reigns and was elected abbess the following year. She also used the title of Princess, but unlike earlier, the Prince-Bishop of Liège did not protest, perhaps because her brother, Maximiliaan Hendrik van Renesse, was Grand-Bailiff of the County of Loon, Head of the nobility of Liège and Secretary and Advisor of the Prince-Bishop. The internal disputes between different factions within the chapter continued in spite of the difficult financial situation. She was daughter of Georg Frederik de Renesse and Anna Margarethe von Bocholtz, and lived 1670-1728).


 

1715-18 Reigning Abbess-General Teresa Badarán de Oxinalde of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

She exercised an unlimited secular authority over more than 60 villages, held her own courts, granted letters dismissorial for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests, within the limits of her abbatial jurisdiction.

1717-76 Princess-Abbess Franziska Christine von der Pfalz-Sulzbach of Thorn, Lady of Thorn, Ittervoort, Grathem, Baexem, Stramproy, Ell, Haler and Molenbeerse (The Netherlands)
1726-76 Princess-Abbess of Essen, Lady of Breisig, Huckard and Rellinghausen (Germany)

After 1718 the principality of Thorn engaged with a long lasting conflict with the Westphalian Circle. The States (Parliament) was not willing to pay fees to the Circle, during the Austrian Succession war, where Thorn paid a fee to Empress Maria-Theresia. In 1726 Franziska Christine was elected as successor to Bernhardina-Sophia von Ostfriesland und Rietberg in Essen she mainly stayed in Essen, where she founded an orphanage - Fürstin-Fransika-Christine-Stiftung. She was daughter of Count Theodor of Pfalz-Sulzbach of the House of Wittelsbach and Maria Eleonora von Hessen-Rheinfels-Rotenburg, and was also Countess of the Rhine, and lived (1696-1776).


 

1717-27 Princess-Abbess Maria Eugenia von Manderscheid of Elten (Germany)

Elected to succeeded her relative, Anna Juliana von Manderscheid, who was Abbess of Thorn, Elten and Vreden, and after her death another relative, Countess Eleonora Maria von Manderscheid was elected Abbess in Elten.

 

1717-48 Princess-Abbess Sophie Charlotte von Bottlenberg gen. Kessel of Käppel  (Germany)

A Protestant, she succeeded the Catholic Anna Elisabeth von der Hees. A successor was not elected until 1753 because of disputes between the Catholic and Protestant parties after the succession of a new "lord-protector" (Schirmherr) of the Chapter, the Catholic Fürst Wilhelm Hyacinth of Nassau-Siegen.                      


Fürstäbtissin Maria Elisabeth zu Quedlinburg, née Princess of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Gottorp

1718-55 Princess-Abbess Maria Elisabeth von Holstein-Gottorp of Quedlinburg (Germany)

Her time in office was marked by the disputes with King Friederich Wilhelm I of Prussia, the Guardian of the Chapter, who anexed parts of her lands. Her protests to the Emperor did not have any effect, and the situation did not normalize until Friederich I came on the throne. She rebuilt and expanded the residential castle of the chapter (Stiftsschloss). She was daughter of Duke Christian Albrecht zu Schleswig-Holstein-Sønderborg-Gottorp and Princess Frederikke Amalie of Denmark, and lived (1678-1755).


 

1718-30 Princess-Abbess Maria Barbara von Liebenfels of Säckingen (Germany)

Reached an agreement with Prince-Bishop Johann Franz Schenk von Stauffenberg of Basel about the rights to the estate of Schliengen. The reconstruction of the church was finished 1727. The daughter of Johann Franz von Liebenfels zu Worblingen and Maria Margarethe Schindelin von Unter-Reitnau, she lived (1666-1730).


 

1718-47 Princess-Abbess Maria Bernardina von Donnersberg of Gutenzell (Germany)

The Princess-Abbess had been a member of the Swabian Circle of the Imperial Diet since 1521.


 

1718-20 Governor Ines de Osio y Mendoza of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Acted in the place of the Reigning Abbess.

 

1719-65 Princess-Abbess Anna Magdalena Franziska von Dondorff of
Obermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

All candidates for the chapter had to undergo a comprehensive education in religion, writing, calculation, history and foreign languages. The 12 canonesses lived a religious life but did not take "Oath" as nuns, did not wear nun-habibits and lived a secular life. Only the Abbess had to be celebate, the other canonisses could marry, and the higly educated ladies were freuquent guests at the court of the Princes of Thurn and Taxis and of the highranking clerics and envoys to the Diet of the Realm in Regensburg. Her family was noble and originated from Thüringen.


Louise Adelaïde d'Orléans of Chelles 

1719-34 Reigning Abbess Louise Adélaïde d'Orléans of Chelles (France)

Also the abbesse of the Val-de-Grâce, a church built under the auspices of her maternal great-grandmother, Anne of Austria, the wife of King Louis XIII. Originally titled Mademoiselle de Chartres, she became Mademoiselle d'Orléans in 1710 after her older sister married Charles, duc de Berry and was known as Madame d'Orléans 1719-34. Died from smallpox at the Convent de la Madeleine de Traisnel in Paris. Daughter of The Regent of France, Philippe II d'Orléans, duc de Chartres, heir to the House of Orléans, and Françoise-Marie de Bourbon, a legitimised natural daughter of Louis XIV and his mistress, Madame de Montespan. She lived (1698-1743).


 

1720-30 Princess-Abbess Maria Franzisca Hundbiss von Waltrams of Lindau  (Germany)

1728 the Area of the Chapter was destroyed in a fire and it was rebuild in baroque stile. Fürstäbtissin Maria Franzisca was member of a noble family from Württemberg, which also spells its name as Hundpiß von Waltrams.


 

1720-23 and 1726-29 Reigning Abbess-General of the Royal Monastery María Magdalena de Villarroel Cabeza de Vaca of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

In a decree she wrote: "We, Doña Mará Magdalena de Villarroel Cabeza de Baca, by the grace of Ggod and the Holy Apostolic Sea, Abbess of the Royal Monestary of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas, the of the City of Burgoes, the Cistercian Order,...., Mother and Legitimate Superior of the Hospital of the King and its compounds  and the convents, churches, erimitages and places with their trust and obidience with omnimodial jurisdiction, privativa, Quasi Episcopal, Nillius, etc..."

1720-22  Princess-Abbess Rosina Clara Schlindlin von Hirschfeld of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
Emperor Karl 6 of Austria-Hungary, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire issued a decree confirming her election as Princely Abbess, "fürstliche Abbatißin zu St. Georg"

 

Until 1720 Abbess Nullius Luigia Tarsia of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

A group of Cistercian Nuns took over the chapter which had existed as a male convent since 889 and also took over the direct papal protection. As Abbess she held semi-episcopal powers until 1806.


 

1720 and 1730 Abbess Nullius Daniela La Forza of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Also Prioress.


Rosina von Kraichgau 1721-38 Reigning Abbess Rosina Susanna Catharina Philippina von Venningen of the Immediate Chapter of Kraichgau (Germany)
The chapter was founded by Amalia Elisabeth won Mentzingen, geb. von Bettendorf, from the inheritance from her parents for Evangelical unmarried ladied from the Ritterkanton Kraichgau (Knights Canton) in Baden, and in 1725 it was granted the status it was granted "reichsfreiheit" incorporated into the Knight's Canton of Kraichgau, but placed under the direct authority of the Holy Roman Emperor. Took over the management of the Chapter in 1718, was inagurated as Abbess in 1721 and got the status of "reigning abbess" or princess-abbess 4 years later.

Abbesse Charlotte Armande de Rohan

1721-33 Reigning Abbess Charlotte Armande de Rohan of the Royal Abbey of Jouarre (France)

Succeeded aunt, Anne Marguerite de Rohan. Daughter of Hercule Meriadec, Duc de Rohan-Rohan, Prince de Soubise et de Maubuisson, etc, Governor of Champagne and Brie and his first wife, Anne Genevieve de Levis-Ventadour, and lived (1696-1733).


1722-? Princess-Abbess Isidora Constantia Raudnitzkin von Brzesnitz of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
Mentioned as "fürstlichen Abbatißin" in a contemporary decree.

 

1722-35 Reigning Coadjutorix Maria Anna Eleonore Reichlin von Meldegg of Schänis (Switzerland)

Elected Koadjutorin with right of succession in 1722 because of the meltan illness of Fürstäbtissin Maria Clara Salomé von Roggenbach, who had been in office since 1713. She managed to get the confirmation of the new statutes by the Bishop and the Papal Nuntius Domenico Passionei in 1732. She concluded an agreement with the community of Schänis about the maintainance of the church. After a stroke in March 1735 she died in January the following year, before Maria Clara Salomé. She lived (1682-1735).


 

1722-23 Princess-Abbess Anna X Haug of Baindt (Germany)

As Princess of The Empire (Fürstäbtissin or Reichsäbtissin), she had the right of a vote in the College of Prelates in the Council of Princes on the Ecclesiastical Bench in the Diet of the Holy Roman Empire.


 

1723-51 Princess-Abbess Maria Magdalena von Dürrheim of Baindt (Germany)

The privilege of lower court of justice that had originally been granted in 1437 was confirmed twice during her reign; in 1734 and 1741. Magdalena's family were lords of Dürreheim near Stuttgart, Freiberg in Schwarzwald in Bavaria and had possessions in Zürich.


 

1723-57 Princess-Abbess Maria Katharina Helena von Aham auf Neuhaus of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

Another version of her surname is von Aham-Neuhaus. The seat of the chapter was situated in the centre of the city of Regensburg, which was the seat of the Imperial Diet (Reichstag), but the chapter had numerous possessions outside the city.


 

1723-26 and 1729-32 Reigning Abbess-General Ana María Helguero y Albarado of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

A relative (possibly her sister), Clara Antonia was Señora Abadesa of Las Huelgas 1732-35.

 

1723 Abbess Nullius Berardina Accolti of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Both secular and temporal ruler of the territory and among others exercised, through a vicar, amost episcopal jurisdiction in the abbital fief of Castellana.


 

1724-27 Abbess Nullius Marcellina Capulli of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Among the many privileges she enjoyed was that of appointing her own vicar-general through whom she governed her abbatial territory; that of selecting and approving confessors for the laity; and that of authorizing clerics to have the cure of souls in the churches under her jurisdiction.


 

1724-43 Princess-Abbess Caroline Charlotte de Berlaimont of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles  (Belgium)

She was member of a noble family originating from Northern France.


 

Around 1726 Princess-Abbess Carolina Margaretha van Renesse van Elderen of Burtscheid (Germany)

The Baroness was mentioned in 1726 when she commissioned the restoration of the two towers of the Chapter Church. She was member of a Dutch noble family.


 

Until 1726 Reigning Abbess Louise Charlotte Eugénie de Beringhen of Faremoutiers (France)

One of 9 children of Jacques Louis de Beringhen, Marquis de Beringhen (1651-1723) and Marie-Madeleine Elisabeth Fare d'Aumont. One of her sisters, Anne Marie Madeleine de Beringhen, was abbess du Pré au Mans aorund 1730.


 

1726-43 Reigning Abbess Olympe Félicité de Beringhen of Faremoutiers (France)

Succeeded her sister, Louise Charlotte as head of the abbey, which enjoyed the attention of several French kings and was an important economic factor within its vast territory in Brie.


 

1727-40 Princess-Abbess Eleonora Maria von Manderscheid of Elten (Germany)
Succeeded her relative Maria Eugenia von Manderscheid and was followed by Eleonora Maria von Manderscheid.

 

1727 Abbess Nullius Cesaria Therami of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

As abbess she was religious head and secular ruler of Conversano. The counts of Conversano and the Vicar-General (Deputy Bishop) also had some authority.


 

1727-30 Abbess Nullius Rosa Caporossi of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Ferdinanda Pascal was elected as her successor in November 1730 but reonuced.


 

1728-54 Princess-Abbess Christine Eberhardine Friederike von Hohenzollern-Hechingen of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)

Like her predecessors, she was in dispute with the Prince-Bishop of Liège over her right to use the title of "Princess of the Holy Roman Empire". After a lengthily court-case, Emperor Karl VI, issued a statement in 1734 demanding that the bishop stopped putting obstacles in the way of the Princess-Abbess and let her conduct her duties as sovereign, and the Emperor later confirmed her title as Princess of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation. The war of the Austrian Succession 1741-48 brought further hardship and devestation. From around 1747 she stayed in Wenen and tried to secure the interests of the chapter at the Imperial Court and the Dechaness Maria Carolina Leerodt von Born was left in charge of the administration of the chapter. The ladies of the chapter protested against her prolonged absence, and after the death of her sister, Sofia, in early 1754 they even tried to depose her, but she died soon after. She was daughter of Friedrich Wilhelm (1663-1735), and Louise von Sinzendorf. She was succeeded as Princess-Abbess by sister, Sofie Johanna Friederike. Christine lived (1695-1754).


Fürstäbissin Johanna Charlotte zu Herford 

1729-50 Princess-Abbess Johanna Charlotte von Anhalt-Dessau of Herford (Germany)

Continued the disputes of her predecessor, Charlotte Sophie, with king Friederich Wilhelm I of Preusia over the continued drafts of soldiers for the ongoing wars - the City of Herford was only an Imperial Immediacy (reichsunmittelbar) on paper, in reality it was treated like a Preusian provincial town and she tried to protect its interests. When she took office, she confirmed the tenantcies of local nobles who held the fiefs of the chapter, using the titulature, Johann Charlotta verwitwete Prinzessin in Preußen, postulierte Äbtissin des Stifts Herford. She was daughter of Johann Georg II von Anhalt-Dessau (1627-60-93) and Henriette Katherine of Nassau-Oranje, and widow of Margrave Philipp Wilhelm von Brandenburg-Schwedt (1669-1688-1711). Mother of 6 children, and in 1764 her granddaughter Friederike Charlotte Leopoldine Luise became the last reigning abbess of the territory. Johanna Charlotte lived (1682-1750).


1730-43 Princess-Abbess Anna-Margarete von Gemmingen of Lindau (Germany)

Her family were Lords of Gemmingen, Bad Rappenau etc. in present day's Baden-Württemberg.


 

1730-34 Princess-Abbess Maria Magdalena von Hallwyl of Säckingen (Germany)

The city was under occupation by French Troops during the Polish Succession War 1733-35. She got permission from Prince-Bishop Johann Franz Schenk von Stauffenberg of Bern for the canonisses to wear a special order of the chapter (Ordenszeichen). The daughter of Johann Joseph von Hallwyl, Lord of Blidegg and Zihlschacht and Maria Julia Katharina von Schönau-Oeschgen, she lived (1692-1734).


Until 1731 Princess-Abbess Maria Augusta von Fürstenberg of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
The daugher of Reichsfürst Wenzel von Fürstenberg and Maria Josepha Truchess Trauchburg Friedberg, her German title was gefürstete Äbtissin d. Benediktinerklosters zu Stankt Georg auf den Hradschin zu Prag (Sv. Jiri in Prag). It was the oldest convent in the Bohmian Lands founded in 973 by Prince Boleslav II and his sister, Mlada. During the reign of Josef II the convent was abolished in 1782. Maria Augusta (d. 1731).

 

1731-32 Abbess Nullius Serafina Girondi of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Also the Abbesses of Aguileia, Brescia, Brindisi, Fucecchio and Goleto held semi episcopal authority.


1732-35  Princess-Abbess Aloysia von Widmann of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
Her election was confirmed by Karl 6 of Austria-Hungary, Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire.

 

1732-35 Reigning Abbess-General Clara Antonia de Helguero y Albarado of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

A relative (possibly sister), Ana María, was Abbess-General 1723-26 and 1729-32.

 

1733-38 Reigning Abbess Anne Therese de Rohan of the Royal Abbey of Jouarre (France)

Daughter of Charles III de Rohan, 5th Duc de Montbazon, Pr de Guéméné, etc, and his second wife Charlotte Elizabeth de Cochefilet. One sister was a nun at the chapter and two of her sisters were also abbesses, Marie Anne Benigne, at Panthemont and Angelique Eleonore at Preaux and Marquette. She lived (1684-1738).


 

1734-53 Princess-Abbess Maria Josepha Regina von Liebenfels of Säckingen (Germany)

The territory was raided during riots in 1741, the so-called 'Salpetererunruhen auf dem Hotzenwald' - peasents riots - and afterwards she allowed the County of Havenstein to pay off the serfs and reached an agreement with the Town of Säckingen about the contracts of priests. The church with had been rebuild in Baroque Style in 1740, was destroyed by another fire already in 1751 and she ordered that it should be rebuild in the new Rococo style. The daughter of Heincich Christoph von Liebenfels, Lord zu Worblingen and Maria Rosa Freiin Vogt von Altensumerau und Prasberg, and lived (1700-53).


 

1734-35 Abbess Nullius Rosa Caporossi of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Exercised, through a vicar, amost episcopal jurisdiction in the abbital fief of Castellana. Among the many privileges she enjoyed was that of appointing her own vicar-general through whom she governed her abbatial territory.


Anne de Clermont-Chaste of Chelles

1734-89 Reigning Abbess Anne de Clermont-Chaste de Gessans of Chelles (France)

Former Canoness at Saint-Cyr, Abbess of Saint Paul de Beurepaire en Vienne in 1725 and later of Chelles. A large number of her relatives were bishops, abbesses and abbots. She lived (1697-1789).


 

1735-63 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Franzisca zu Rhein of Schänis (Switzerland)

Her aunt, Maria Anna Susana zu Rhein, had been ruler of the territory 1701-11. The daughter of Johann Franz Ludwig zu Rhein zu Mortzwiller and Maria Sibylla von Roggenbach, she lived (1684-1763).


1735-.. Princess-Abbess Anna Scholastica Paulerin von Hohenburg of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
Emperor Karl 6 confirmed her election. "Carl der Sechste, Römischer Kayser", bestätigt die neugewählte Äbtissin von St. Georg"

 

1735-38 and 1741-42 Reigning Abbess-General María Teresa Baradán de Oxinalde  of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

A relative of hers, Teresa, was Señora Abadesa de Las Huelgas 1715-18.

1737-51 Princess-Abbess Maria Antonia Überacker of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
Member of an Austrian Countly family.

Princess-Abbesse Anne Charlotte I de Remiremont, née Princesse de Lorraine

1738-73 Princesse-Abbesse Anne Charlotte I de Lorraine of Remiremont, Dame de Saint Pierre and Metz et cetera (France)
1754-73 Secular Abbess of Sainte-Waudru in Mons (Belgium)
1756-73 Coadjutrix of Thorn (The Netherlands)
1757-73 Coadjutrix of Essen (Germany)

Daughter of Duke Léopold I Joseph of Lorraine and Élisabeth Charlotte d'Orléans, and moved to the Low Countries where sister-in-law, Anna-Maria was Governor-General in 1744 and her brother, Karl, continued in office after his wife's death until 1746 and then again 1749-80. She lived in Vienna 1745-54 at the court of her sister-in-law, Maria Theresia of Austria-Hungary, who was married to her brother, Emperor Franz Stephan. She became his close advisor and very influential, from 1760 with the title of Dame instead of Demoiselle. She was present in Prague when her sister-in-law laid the foundation stone for the the Ladies Chapter at the Hradschin. In 1766 Lorraine was incorporated in France after having belonged to the Holy Roman Empire for centuries. She lived (1714-73).


 

1738-40 Abbess Nullius Giuseppa Bassi of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

There were also Abbesses with semi-episcopal authority in France and Spain.


Dorothea Sybilla von Kraichgau 1738-70 Reigning Abbess Dorothea Sybilla von Mentzingen of the Immediate Chapter of Kraichgau (Germany)
Member of an old local noble family, which held high administrative and ecclesiastical offices throughout the centuries. No successor was appointed until 1775.

Abbesse Catherine Henriette of Jouarre

1738-92 Reigning Abbess Catherine-Henriette de Montmorin of the Royal Abbey of Jouarre (France)

Doubled the Monastery buildings. One of the wings, the porch of the actual rue Montmorin and the chaplain's residence is still the major part of the Abbey. From 1790, the lands of the Abbey were confiscated by the revolutionary Committee, the buildings were put up for sale and the expulsion order was promulgated in 1792. This event was to be the death of the Abbess. She passed away on September 27th.


1738-43 Abbess Friederike von Wurttemberg-Neuenstadt of the Chapter of Vallø (Denmark)

Danish Dowager Queen Sofie Magdalene had decided to turn the County of Vallø, which was part of her dowry, into a Lutheran chapter for unmarried ladies of the high nobility. The abbesses had authority in the Stift and possessed jus vocandi - the right to appoint the priests in the 17 churches within its territory, and were also in charge of the secular administration. She was daughter of Duke Friedrich August von Württemberg-Neuenstadt and Sofie Esther Gräfin von Eberstein. Her seven brothers died in infancy and only her two sisters survived, and after the death of their uncle, Carl Rudolf, she took up residence at the Castle of Neuenstadt together with one of them, Eleonore Wilhelmine Charlotte (1894-1751). She lived (1699-1781)

1738-41 and 1745-48 Reigning Abbess-General Isabel Rosa de Orense of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Several members of her family was elected to the office of Señora Abadesa of Las Huelgas.


1739-72 Reigning Abbess Maria Dioskora Maura von Thurn und Valsassina of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

A member of the Taxis-family that were divided into the lines of Counts von Thurn und Valsassina, Princess of Thurn und Taxis and the Spanish line of Tassis and held the offices of Postmaster General in the Holy Roman Empire, Spain and other territories .She lived (1702-72).


1740-84 Princess-Abbess Maria Franziska II von Manderscheid of Elten (Germany)

Elected as successor of Eleonora Maria von Manderscheid as the fifth and last consecutive sovereign of that Family in the Reichstift Elten (Chapter of the Realm). 1742 she banned excessive funerals and weddings and the following year she banned private schools.


1742-74 Princess-Abbess Maria Karolina von Königsegg-Rothenfels of Buchau, Lady of Strassberg (Germany)
She also used the name, Maria Charlotte, and was daughter of Count Carl Friedel Desiderius von Königsegg-Rothenfels and Maximiliane von Althann. One of her sisters, Anna Wilhelmine, was Abbess of Sankt Ursula in Köln. Like the election of her predecessor, it took place without the participation of the bishop of Konstanz. She lived (1707-74).

1742-73 Princess-Abbess Maria Alydis Zech of Heggbach (Germany)

According to tradition; she swore an oath of allegiance to Pope Benedict XIV in the presence of the representative of the Paternal Abbey of Salem. Prioress Marie Anne Assam claimed that Alydis' election had not been fair, but resigned from her post after half a year after having asked for forgiveness. She defended her rights as ruler in various - expensive - court cases against the inhabitants of the territory and neighbouring lords. After centuries of disputes with the clerical superiors, the Abbots of Salem, the last mentioned had agreed with the pope to leave the responsibility to another Abbey, much to the disdain and chock to her and the Abbesses of among others Baindt, Gutenzell, Rottenmünster and Wald, who all protested in a joint statement. Because of illness she was not present at the College of the Swabian Prelates (Schwabische Reichsprälatkollegium) in 1767. The College had one collective vote in the Ecclesiastical Bench of the Council of Princes in the Imperial Diet. The Princess-Abbesses of Baindt, Gutenzell and Rottenmünster were present. She lived (1713-73).


1742-53 Reigning Abbess Louise-Claire de Montmorin de Saint-Hérem of the Royal Abbey of Fontevraud (France)
Member of a cadet branch of a noble family of Auvergne.

1742-45 Reigning Abbess-General Lucía de Mioño of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Head of the dependent Parishes of Bercial and Lorilla.


 

1742... Reigning Abbess Marie-Charlotte de Béthune of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Elected as successor to her aunt, Madeleine-Eugenie de Béthune des Placques.


1743-57 Princess-Abbess Therese Wilhelmine von Pollheim-Winkelhausen of Lindau  (Germany)

Her family was in charge of the Lordship of Ottenschlag wich became became the center of the Low-Austrian protestantism in 16th and  17th century.

1743-74 Princess-Abbess Ursule Antoinette van Berlo de Francdouaire of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles (Belgium)
Member of a French-Belgian noble family.

 

1743-59 Abbess Nullius Irene Margaritonte of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

The ancient tradition of the clergy paying public homage to newly elected and inagurated Abbesses was abolished in 1750.


 

After 1743 Reigning Abbess Marie-Anne de Béringhen of Faremoutiers (France)

At a not known time she was succceded by Claude de Durfort, a member of the family of the Dukes de Duras.


 

1744-60 Administratrice Hélène de Cléron of Remiremont (France)

Dame Doyenne and Second in Command since circa 1717 she took over the role of Acting Princess-Abbess after Anne Charlotte I de Lorraine left the territory to take up residence by her brother, Karl von Lothringen, Governor-General of the Low Countries in 1744, and was never to return to her chapter. (d. 1760).


1747-59 Princess-Abbess Maria Franziska von Gall of Gutenzell (Germany)
In 1753 the Chapter (Stift) came under the protection of von Kaisheim with the approval of the Abbot-General Trouvé.  During 1755-57 the renovation of the the Chapter Church in Baroque style was finished by Dominikus Zimmermann. His daughter, Alexandra, became Princess-Abbess in 1759.

Princess Louise Sophie Friederike af Danmark, Heiress to Norway, Duchess to Slesvig-Holsten, Glücksborg, Stormarn and Ditmarsken.

1748-82 Abbess Louise Sophie Friederike zu Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Glücksborg of the Chapter of Vallø (Denmark)

She used the titles: Heiress to Norway, Duchess to Slesvig-Holsten, Glücksborg, Stormarn and Ditmarsken. She possed both secular and ecclesiastical authority in the whole territory of the Lutheran chapter for unmarried noble ladies, though the founder, Dowager Queen Sofie Magdalene had secured herself the right of veto for life. Louise Sopie was daughter of Duke Philipp Ernst of Holstein-Glücksburg and his first wife Christiane of Sachsen-Eisenberg, she was succeeded by her niece, Sophie Magdalene, and lived (1709-82).


1748-51 and  1754-56 Reigning Abbess-General Josefa Carrillo y Ocampo of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Reelected to the post of Abbess of the Abbey.


1750-64 Princess-Abbess Hedwig Sophie Auguste von Holstein-Gottorp of Herford (Germany)
The Princess was Dechaness in Quedlinburg until she became Pöpstin there Quedlinburg in a personal-union 1728-64, but resided in Herford all the time. She was daughter of Duke Christian August of Holstein-Gottorp and Albertine Friederike zu Baden-Durlach. Her sister, Friederike Amalie (1708-32) was a canoness at Quedlinburg. She lived (1705- 1764).

 

1750-74 Princess-Abbess Marie Béatrice Breiten de Landenberg of the Royal Abbey of Andlau (France)

Also known as Maria Beatrix von Breitenlandenberg.


1751-68 Princess-Abbess Cäcilia Seitz of Baindt (Germany)
In 1767 she was the last Abbess from the territory to personally participate in the Schwabische Reichsprälatkollegium - which send representatives to the Imperial Diet. The Princess-Abbess of Gutenzell and Rottenmünster were also present.

1751-78 Princess-Abbess Maria Henrica von Poppen of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
Member of a family of Slesian Barons (Freiiherren), she was highly educated, gifted painter and promoter of arts and culture. At her seal she used the titulature: Marin Henrick Freyin v. Poppen, Äbtissin zu Göss.

1751-54 and 1759-62 Reigning Abbess-General María Bernarda de Hoces of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

A relative of hers, Angela, was elected Señora Abadesa of Las Huelgas 1771-74.


1753-80 Princess-Abbess Johanna Dorothea von Syberg zu Schwerte of Keppel (Germany)
Joined the chapter in 1718 and was elected as successor of the Protestant Sophie Charlotte v. Bottlenberg gen. Kessel, who had died 1748. Johanna Dorothea Helene Margarethe Katharina von Syberg, who was also known as von Syberg, Freie aus der Hees, Sümmern und Schwerte, was a Catholic and member of an old noble family with branches in Germany, Livonia and Sweden.

1753-55 Princess-Abbess Maria Helena Francisca von Roggenbach of Säckingen (Germany)
Finished the restauration of the interior of the Chapter Church which was damamged by a fire in 1751. One of her relatives, Franz Joseph Sigismund, was Prince Bishop of Basel (1782-93). She was daughter of Johann Konrad Anton von Roggenbach, Steward of Birseck, and Maria Josepha Zint von Kenzingen.

1753-65 Reigning Abbess Marie-Louise de Timbrone de Valence of the Royal Abbey of Fontevraud (France)
Another version of her surname is de Thimbrune de Valence.

1754 Princess-Abbess Sophie Johanna zu Hohenzollern-Hechingen of Münsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)
Chosen by the other Ladies of the Chapter (Stiftdamen) to suceed sister, Christine Eberhardine Friederike, they were daughters of Count Friedrich Wilhelm (1663-1735), and Louise von Sinzendorf. Sofie Johanna Friederike lived (1698-1754).

1755-56 Princess-Abbess Maria Carolina von Leerodt von Born of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)
She had been a candidate for the post of Abbess in 1728 and as Dechaness she had been in charge of the administration of the chapter in the absence of the Abbess from around 1747, but in spite of this, the representative of the Prince-Bishop of Liège tried to prevent her election and only 6 canonesses and 4 canons took part - with 5 abstns. The disputes within the chapter continued but she died after only 17 months in office, and lived (circa 1700-56).

Reichsfürstin zu Quedlinburg 1755-87 Princess-Abbess Anna Amalia von Preußen  of Quedlinburg (Germany)
Coadjutrix (Coadjutorin) of the territory 1744-55. She became a renowned musician and composer. She had an affair with Freiherr Friedrich von der Trenck, an aide-de-champ of her brother, king Friedrich the Great, who was imprisoned, later freed and spend the rest of his life travelling in Europe. After her brother's death they met in 1786, she was blind and very ill at the time and died shortly after. She lived most of her life in Berlin and did only rarely visit her territory. She was daughter of Wilhelm I of Preussen and Princess Sophie von Hannover, and lived (1723-87).

Fürstäbtissin Maria Anna von Hornstein-Göffingen of Säckingen 1755-1806 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna von Hornstein-Göffingen of Säckingen (Germany)
In 1785 her forceful intervention at the Imperial Court in Vienna had saved the Princely Ladies Chapter (Fürstliche Damenstift) from becoming a Worldly Ladies' Chapter under the sovreignty of the Austrian Government and without cannons during the ecclesiastical reforms of Emperor Joseph II. She modernized the financial management and the juridical system. 1793 Johanna Caroline von Oettingen-Spielberg was appointed Administrator. During the Peace of Pressburg (Bratislava) the Austrian "Vorlande" was separated between Baden and Württemberg, and the territory of Säckingen became part of Baden. In September 1806 the convent was abolished, but she remained there until her death. Among her possessions was a carriage with room for all of the 16 noble ladies who inhabited the convent. The last Fürstäbtissin was daughter of Freiherr Franz von Hornstein und Zumarschausen and Maria Anna Sophia Karoline von Sickingen, and lived (1723-1809).

1756-59 Reigning Abbess-General Josefa Claudia de Verrio, The Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Known as "noble lady, the superior, prelate, and lawful administratrix in spirituals and temporals of the said royal abbey, and of all the contents, churches, and hermitages of its filiations, of the villages and places under its jurisdiction, seigniory, and vassalage, in virtue of Bulls and Apostolical concessions, with plenary jurisdiction, privative, quasi-episcopal, nullius diacesis."


1756-71 Princess-Abbess Antonietta Regina Sofie Francisca von und zu Elz-Kempenich of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)
After the death of Fürstäbtissin Maria Carolina, she won the election to the position of Princess-Abbess against the Dechaness Sophia Helena von Stadion, who remained in opposition to the new head of the territory and allied herself with the Prince-Bishop of Liège, who still tried to assert his authority over the Princess-Abbess. After her election she had started rebuilding the residence of the Abbess that had been destroyed earlier. French troops passed through the territory in 1758 during the Seven Year War between France and Austria on one side and England and Preussia on the other. During the last year of her reign, she was seriously ill and had to hand over the adminsitrator to Sophia Helena. She was daughter of Karl Anton Count and Noble Lord (Graf und Edler Herr) von und zu Eltz-Kempenich, gennant Faust von Stromberg, who was created Reichsgraf and became Hereditary Marshal of Trier in 1733,  and Helene Katharina Freiin Wambolt von Umstadt, and lived (1700-71).

Fürstabtissin Maria Anna Margarethe von Lindau, geborene Freiin von Gemmingen

1757-71 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Margarethe von Gemmingen of Lindau (Germany)

Member of the freiherrliche family von Gemmingen, Lords of Burg Guttenberg abowe the Neckar for at least 300 years from around 1500. She lived (1711-71)

1757-68 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Katharina von Dücker-Hasslen-Urstein-Winkel of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)
Member of the Freiherrliche family of von Dücker.

1759-76 Princess-Abbess Alexandra Zimmermann of Gutenzell (Germany)
As part of her "dowry", her father, buildingmaster Dominikus Zimmermann, had finished the renovation of the Church of the Chapter, a work that he finished in 1757. 10 years later, she was the last Abbess from Gutenzell to personally participate in the Schwabische Reichsprälatkollegium - which send representatives to the Imperial Diet. Also present were the Princess-Abbesses of Baindt and Rottenmünster. The Princess-Abbess of Heggbach was not present because she was ill. From 1768 the Fürstäbtissin exercised her right as Lady of the Court of her Office in the territory.

 

1759/63 Abbess Nullius Floralba Maurelli of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Among her privileges was those of selecting and approving confessors for the laity and authorizing clerics to have the cure of souls in the churches under her jurisdiction.


1760-73 Administratrice Hyacinthe Céleste de Briey de Landres of Remiremont (France)
Succeeded Hélène as Dame Doyenne and Head of the Chapter for the absent Princess Abbess Anne Charlotte de Lorraine, who lived in Austria and Mons. Hyachinthe Céleste lived (1713-89).

1762-65, 1768-71 and 1783-86 Reigning Abbess-General María Benita de Oñate of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Many members of her family were Governors in various parts of the New World (Southern America)


1763-96 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Anastasia von Eptingen of Schänis (Switzerland)
1782 she renovated the chapter and its church in Rococo style. She was daughter of the noble Konrad Anton von Eptingen and Katharina Jacobea von Ramschwag.

1764-1802 Princess-Abbess Friedrike Charlotte Leopoldine Luise zu Brandenburg-Schwedt of Herford (Germany)
The Royal Princess of Preusia had been Koadjutorin from 1755. She was the last sovereign ruler of the Ecclesiastical Territory which was incorporated into Prussia in 1802 as part of the rearrangement of the German Realm after the Napolionic wars. She remained in the Chapter until shortly before she died after years of ilness. She was daughter of Margrave Friedrich Heinrich von Preußen of Brandeburg-Schwedt and Leopoldine zu Anhalt-Dessau. Her grandmother, Johanna Charlotta von Anhalt-Dessau had been Princess-Abbess of Herford (1729-50) before her marriage. lived (1745-1808).      

Gräfin Franzisca Josepha von Freudenberg 1765-75 Princess-Abbess Maria Franzisca Josepha von Freudenberg of Obermünster Regensburg (Germany)
She was member of the Bench of Swabian Prelates in the Diet of the Realm (Reichstag), who were able to cast a collective vote - a socalled curiate (Kuriatstimme). The same was the case for the Westphalian counts in the College of Princes (Fürstenkolleg), where only the major Princes had their own votes. The Princess-Abbesses normally voted via representatives (by proxy) as did many of the other princes.

Julie-Sophie-Gillette de Gondrin de Pardaillan d'Antin 1765-92 Reigning Abbess Julie Sophie Charlotte de Pardaillan d'Antin of the Royal Abbey of Fontevraud (France)
Julie-Sophie-Gillette de Gondrin de Pardaillan d'Antin was driven from her monastery by the Revolution; her fate is unknown. Towards the end of the eighteenth century there were 230 nuns and 60 monks at Fontevrault, and at the Revolution there were still 200 nuns, but the monks were few in number and only formed a community at the mother-house. In the course of his preaching journeys through France, Robert d'Arbrissel had founded a great number of houses, and during the succeeding centuries others were given to the order. In the seventeenth century the Fontevrist priories numbered about sixty in all and were divided into the four provinces of France, Bretagne, Gascone, and Auvergne. The order never attained to any great importance outside France though there were a few houses in Spain and England. (d. 1797).

1765-68 Reigning Abbess-General Rosalía de Chaves of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Among the many dignities and high offices held by the abbess of Las Huelgas was that of the title of Verdana of the Order for the Kingdom of Leon and Castile dating from 1189, which gave her the privilege of convoking a general chapter at Burgos each year.


1766-77 Princess-Abbess Therese Natalie von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel of Gandersheim  (Germany)
The Princess spend most of the time at the court in Braunschweig and the chapter fell apart. She was Daughter of Ferdinand Albrecht of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel and Antoinette Amalie of Braunschweig-Blankenberg. Her sister was the de-facto regent Queen Juliane-Marie of Denmark (1729-72-84-96). Therese Natalie lived (1728-78).

Maria Anna von Habsburg-Lothringen 1766-81 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna von Habsburg-Lothringen of the Theresian Noble Convent at the Hradschin in Prague  (Austria-Hungary (Österreich-Ungarn))
The convent had been founded by her mother, Empress Maria Theresia, in 1755. As abbess she enjoyed princely ecclesiastical rank (fürstliche geistliche würde), only temporal duties and a high income. The Archduchess was member of a number of Imperial Academies of Art and was interested in science and music. In 1781 she resigned and moved to Klagenfurt where she lived close to the he Elizabethan Convent the rest of her life, and died in the circle of her friends, including Xaveria Gasser, the Prioress of the Chapter (Oberin des Klosters) and she willed her fortune to the nuns. She lived (1738-89).

Erzherzogin Maria Elisabeth von Habsburg-Lothringen 1767-1805/08 Princess-Abbess Maria Elisabeth von Habsburg-Lothringen of the Royal Chapter in Innsbruck (Austria-Hungary)
The chapter was founded by her mother, Empress Maria Theresia of Austria-Hungary with the purpose of praying for her her father  Emperor Franz I Stefan, who died the same year. The Archduchess had been hit by small-pox in 1767 and she became Abbess of the Worldly Chapter for noble ladies. She became the center of the town-life because of her extrovert personality. In 1805 she fled the Napolionic troops and three years later the convent was disolved by Bavaria. She lived (1743-1808).

1767-70 Maria Augusta Josepha von Fürstenberg-Stühlingen of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
Given the right to become canoness in Buchau from 1741 but it is not known is she acctually took up the position. 1767 Empress Maria Theresia confirmed her election "Maria Theresia, Kömische Kayserin, Wittib“ bestätigt die „nach tödtlichem Hintritt der Anna Scholastica Paulerin von Hohenburg“ erfolgte Wahl der „Maria Josepha aus dem fürstlichen Hauß von Fürstenberg“ zur Aebtissin von St. Georg". She was daughter of Joesph Wilhelm Ernst von Fürstenberg and Maria Anna von Waldstein. (d. 1770).

1768-1802 Princess-Abbess Maria Bernarda von Markdorf of Baindt (Germany)
In 1797 the convent reached its peak with 37 noble ladies, but in 1803 it was abolished. Maria Bernarda's family had been Lords of Markdorf, by the Bodensee, since the 11th century.

 

Until 1768 Reigning Abbess Françoise de Dion de Wandonne of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

Daughter of the Lord of Wanndonne, Couplelle, Louvigny and La Viélville.


 

1768-90 Reigning Abbess Marie Hosephe Camille de Coupigny d'Hénu of Bourbourg, Lady of Oxelaere, Noordpeene, Faumont and Coutiches (France)

The French Council of State confirmed the original provision, that the canonesses had to be of noble families from the Low Countries or Artois, who could trace back noble origin from both sides of their family for at least 4 quarters (generations). She wasaughter of the Lord of Hénu, Warlincourt and Marie Héricourt.


1769-89 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Febronia Elisabeth Speth von Zwyfalten of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)
Her family were Freiherren - Barons - in Hohenzollern, and also known as von Speth-Zwyfalten.

1770-? Princess-Abbess Maria Electa Wrazda von Kunwald  of the Royal Chapter St. Georg at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Czech Republic)
Her election was confirmed by Empress Maria Theresia: "Maria Theresia, Römische Kayserin, Wittib", bestätigt die nach dem Tode der Maria Josepha von Fürstenberg erfolgte Wahl der Maria Electa Freyin Wrazda von Kunwald zur Aebtissin von St. Georg." 

 

Around 1770 Reigning Abbess Germaine de Conty d'Hargicourt of Montvilliers (France)

Unpopular and accused the sisters of misusing the revenues of the abbey. The chapter was abandoned during the French revolution in 1792.


1771-81 Princess-Abbess Maria Josepha Agatha von Ulm-Langenrhein of Lindau (Germany)
Her family had many Prince-Bishops and other eccleastical office holders trough the times.

1771-74 Reigning Abbess-General Angela de Hoces of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

The Lady Abbess of Las Huelgas held her own courts, granted letters dismissorial for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests, within the limits of her abbatial jurisdiction, to hear confessions, to preach, and to engage in the cure of souls.


1772-89 Princess-Abbess Sofia Helena von Stadion-Tannhausen of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)
When the Countess became Dechaness in 1755, she had been Vice-Dechaness for some years. In 1756 she lost the elections for the post of Princess Abbess to Antonietta von und zu Eltz-Kempenich  and sided with the Bishop of Liège in the long lasting dispute over the position of the Princess-Abbess and territory. After Antonietta's death, Sophia was in charge of the territory in her capacity as Dechaness. She accepted the "capitulation" of 1773 and recognized the owerlordship of Liège but kept the title of Princess and the lordship of her possessions. She stopped the internal infightings that lasted for centuries, but like her predecessors she was an authoritarian figure. The territory was marked by the ongoing wars and the economic situation very bad. After the election of Waldburg von Heidenheim in 1783, she seems to have lost some of her authority within the chapter. (d. 1789).

 

1772-99 Reigning Abbess Maria Edmunda von Kolb of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

Mentioned as 1758 Kastnerin (bursary officer) and the related offices of Bursiererin and Oberbursiererin 1768-72. Her brother, who was a Pastr in Dietersofeh, accused her of mis-management and supression of her subects and she was put under temporary administration in 1785. She was daughter of Karl Ferdinand von Kolb and Maria Anna Karrer, and lived (1734-99).


1773-92 Princess-Abbess Maria Juliana Kurz of Heggbach (Germany)

Elected Abbess in third round after the 7 other candidates had been defeated, and managed to manoeuvre through Joseph II of Austria's "anti-nun" reforms of 1782 because the Abbesses were highly politically influential because of the centuries of independence (Reichsunmittelbarkeit) and uninterrupted membership of the College of the Prelates of the Realm, even though she was normally represented at the meetings of the Assemblies of the Realm, Circles and College, she would always be in close contact with her envoy. In July 1790 the Emperor wrote to her asking for a military contribution and she answered in August, and the territory was hard hit by the French wars. When Joseph died two years later, a "party of gratitude" was celebrated after the election of his successor. She lived (1726-92).


1773-75 Princesse-Abbesse Abbess Christine de Saxe of Remiremont (France)
Marie-Christine von Sachsen, Royal Princess of Poland was one of the 14 children of King Friedrich August III of Poland and became Coadjutrice in 1764 after the personal intervention of her sister's father-in-law, king Louis XV as her sister Marie Josephe (1731-67) was the second wife of the heir to the French throne, Louis (1729-65), whose son succeeded as King Louis XVI in 1774. Another sister was Marie Kuningunde, Princess-Abbess of Essen and Thorn from 1776. Their brother, Duke Albert von Teschen, was married to Marie-Christine von Hasburg, and they were joint Governor-Generals of the Lower Netherlands. Their father had 354 known children outside marriage. She lived (1735-82).

 

1773 Abbess Nullius Vincenza Martucci of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

The Cistercian monastery existed from before 889 and was placed under direct papal protection in 1110 and 1266 it was given to a group of Cistercian Nuns.


1774-96 Princess-Abbess Marie Félicité Philippine van der Noot of Nivelles, Dame Temporaire and Spirituelle of Nivelles (Belgium)
The Countess was the last reigning Princess-Abbess of Nivelles, which was occupied by France and afterwards incorporated into the Kingdom of the Netherlands. She was member of the old Bruxelloise noble family whose title dates back to the beginning of the 1330s.

1774-77, 1780-83 and 1786-89 Reigning Abbess-General María Teresa de Chaves y Valle of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Temporal and Secular ruler of the territory.


Maria Josepha, Fürstin des heiligen Römischen Reiches, Äbtissin des adeligen Damestiftes in Obermünster

1775-1803 Princess-Abbess Maria Josepha Felicitas von Neuenstein-Hubacker of Obermünster in Regensburg (Germany)

The Freiin (Free Lady) von Neunstein was the last sovereign of the territory, which included the Hofmarks (Seigneurities) of Obertraublingen and Oberröhrenbac, the Provosties of Tegenheim, Sallbach, Mettenbach, Langenpreising, Grosshausen and Ottmaring and a member of farms all over Bavaria and circa 100 in the surroundings of Regensburg and also owned a substantial number of houses within the city. Known as an able ruler, she renovated the building of the chapter 1784-99 and the state experienced a period of economic growth. 1781 a number of younger canonesses appealed to the bishop of Regensburg for better living conditions, more servants etc, but her spartan approach won the upper hand. The territory was secularized in 1803 and became part of Bavaria/Bayern in 1805. She remained an inhabitant of the Chapter for the rest of her life. She was daughter of Privy Councillor and Crown Equerry  of the Princes of Fürstenberg, Freiherr Reinhard Friederich von Neuenstein and Maria Anna Maximiliana Theresia von Frauenberg. In her death announcement she was mentioned as Honorable Lady Maria Josepha, Fürstin des heiligen Römischen Reiches, Äbtissin des adeligen Damestiftes in Obermünster. she lived (1739-1822).


Maria Maximiliana von Stadion 1775-1802 Princess-Abbess Maria Maximiliana von Stadion of Buchau (Germany)
The Countess was the last Sovereign Ruler of the Ecclesiastical Territory, and elected in the third round of voting with the participation of 10 Ladies of the Chapter and 2 Canons (Chorherren). Like that of her predecessor's her election took part without the participation of the Bishop of Konstanz, and he protest but ended up inagurating her. During her reign she reached compromises with the neighbors, the Count von Hohenberg and Prince zu Turn und Taxis, about some of the lands of the territory. During the end of her reign, she was preoccupied with the financial strain caused by the Coalition Wars. In July 1802 she had to flee for the invading French forces, but later returned. Her and the other families of the Ladies of the Chapter protested against the secularization and abolision of the chapter and territory using the the argument that the territory was already secular and not ecclesiastical. In the end Turn and Taxis took over the territory, and she moved to München and lived there the rest of her life. She was daughter of Count Anton Heinrich Friedrich von Stadion zu Thannhausen und Wartenhausen, Minister of the Elector of Mainz, and Freiin Maria Anna Augusta Antonia von Sickingen-Hohenburg. Maria Maximiliana Esther lived (1736-1818).

1775-86 Princesse-Abbesse Anne Charlotte II de Lorraine-Brionne of Remiremont (France)
Coadjutrice 1775-82 and arrived at Remiremont in 1784 and only visited the chapter a few times. She was daughter of Louis III Lorraine-Harcourt-Armagnac,  duc de Lorraine-Harcourt, comte Armagnac and his third wife Louise de Rohan. She lived (1756-86).

1775-1802 Reigning Abbess Sophie Friederike von Holle of the Immediate Chapter of Kraichgau (Germany)
The free-worldly chapter for noble ladies, were place directly under the Holy Roman Emperor and the Imperial Diet, without any intermediary liege lord, and had the right to collect taxes and tolls themselves, and held juridical rights. De facto imperial immediacy corresponded to a semi-independence with a far-reaching autonomy.

Maria Kunigunde von Sachsen 1776-97 Princess-Abbess Maria Kunigunde von Sachsen of Thorn, Lady of Thorn, Ittervoort, Grathem, Baexem, Stramproy, Ell, Haler and Molenbeerse (The Netherlands)
1776-1803
Princess-Abbess of Essen,
Lady of Breisig, Huckard and Rellinghausen (Germany)

After the failed weddings plans with Empress Maria-Teresia's son, the later Joseph II of Austria, The Royal Princess of Poland and Sachsen was elected Coadjutorin of Essen and Thorn in 1775 with the right of succession, which took place the following year after the death of Franziska Christine von der Pfalz-Sulzbach. As Sovereign of the 2 Ecclesiastical Territories of Thorn and Essen in the Netherlands and Germany, she spend most of her time by her brother, Elector Klemens Wenzeslaus von Trier, and dominated the government here. During her reign Thorn experienced a strong economic growth, but when the war between Austria and France broke out on 1793, the ladies escaped to the other side of the Rhine. When the French had to withdraw the following year, 6 ladies returned, including Dechaness Clementine von Hessen-Rhinfels, who took the reigns and they were both busy buying back lands - securing the role of a "Free Lordship of the Realm" (Freie Reichsherrlichkeiten) - as all Ecclesiastical Territories were abolished by the Imperial Diet in 1803. She was the 14th and last child of the Elector of Sachsen and King of Poland and Lithauen, Friedrich August II and Maria Josepha von Habsburg. Her sister, Marie Christine, was Princess-Abbess of Remiremont from 1773. Known as Maria Cunegonda in Thorn, she lived (1749-1826).


1776-1803 Princess-Abbess Justina von Erolzheim of Gutenzell (Germany)
She was the last sovereign ruler of the territory which was secularized and first taken over by Joseph August von Toerring-Jettenbach and then incorporated into Württemberg. The last canoness died in 1859. Justina (d. 1809).

1776-97 Abbess Amalia Dorothea Elisabetha von der Bottlenberg gnt. Kessel of the Free Worldly Abbey of Elsey (Germany)
Until 1793 the territory did not have a vote in the Local Assembly, but that year she bought the Manor of Berchum and thereby the Chapter came in the possession of its vote in the Landtag (In German: Berchumer Landtagsstimme). The Abbess was Dame of a number of possessions in Hohenlimburg but never had any sovereignty or any other rights than a local noble landowner.

1777-80 Reigning Abbess-General María Ana de Acedo y Torres of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

As Señora Abadesa de Las Huelgas, she had the privilege to confirm Abbesses of dependent Convents, to impose censures, and to convoke synods.


Fürstäbtissin Auguste Dorothea zu Gandersheim, geb. Herzogin zu Braunschweig

1778-1802 Princess-Abbess Auguste Dorothea zu Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel of Gandersheim  (Germany)

The last Sovereign of the Ecclesiastical Ruler of the Territory of the Realm. 1776 she had become Dechaness in Quedlinburg and shortly after she was also elected to the post in Gandersheim, but refused to take up the position. Two years later she accepted the post of Princess-Abbess in Gandersheim but continued to spend most of her time at the court of Braunschweig, later also Pröpstin in Quedlinburg. In 1802 she resigned her rights and the chapter accepted the sovreignty of Braunschweig, but remained it's Abbess until her death. After her death, King Jerome of Westphalen abolished and anexed the chapter. She was daughter of  Karl I von Braunschweig (1713-35-80) and Augusta of Great Britain, and lived (1749-1810).


1779-83 Princess-Abbess Maria Gabriela von Schaffmann of Göss bei Leoben (Austria)
The Freiin von  Schaffmann-Hämmerle was the last Abbess of the Princely Chapter which was seculized by Emperor Joseph of Austria-Hungary together with all other both male and female convents within his realms. She lived (1724-1802).

 

Around 1779-circa 93 Abbess Nullius Rosalba Noja of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Another version of her surname is Noya.


1780-1803 Princess-Abbess Marianne Antonia von Donop of Keppel   (Germany)
A Protestant, she was elected as successor to the Catholic Johanna Dorothea von Syberg. The Ecclesiastical Territory was incorporated into Nassau in 1803, but in 1808 Marquise Isabelle de Meslé (1761-1820) was appointed as Abbess by Joachim Murat, brother-in-law of Napoleon I, but never inagurated. The Marquise lived in the Chapter until it was abolished in 1812. Marianne Antonia von Donop (d. 1806)

1781-96 Princess-Abbess Friederike Caroline Josephine von Bretzenheim of Lindau (Germany)
The Fürstäbtissin was illegitimate daughter of Josepha Seyfert (1748-71) and Elector Karl IV Theodor of Kurpfalz (1742-77) and Elector of Bavaria (1777-79). In 1796 she married Count Maximilian von Westerhold (d. 1854). and 1802 her brother came in possession of the territories of the Chapter after it was secularized. Friederike had a twin-sister, Eleonore Caroline, and lived (1771-1816).

 

Around 1781 and 1786 Abbess Nullius Cherubina Therami of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Listed as ruler in in 1689 in the alternative list of abbesses


 

1782-86 Abbess Nullius Fedele Renna of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

Among the few Abbesses in the world to hold semi-episcopal powers and ecclesiastical jurisdiction.


Picture from the old fountatious showing the gown of the Abbess of the Chapter of Vallø

1782-1810 Abbess Sophie Magdalene af Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Glücksborg of the Chapter of Vallø (Denmark)

She used the titles of Heiress to Norway, Duchess to Slesvig, Hosten, Glücksborg, Stormarn og Ditmarsken, Countess to Oldenborg og Delmenhorst. She was head of the Lutheran chapter for unmarried noble ladies influenced both Church, shools, roads, bridges, inns, mills, forestry, care of the poor and sick. It was desided not to appoint new Abbesses after her death, and the Dechaness became the leader of the Chapter. She was daughter of Duke Friedrich of Schleswig-Holstein-Sønderborg-Glücksborg and Henriette Auguste zur Lippe-Detmold. After the death of her brother, Friedrich Heinrich Wilhelm of Glücksburg, Plön, Norburg and Rethwisch, his widow, Anna Karoline of Nassau-Saarbrücken, was de-facto regent of Glücksborg for many years. Sophie Magdalene lived (1746-1810).


 

1784-89 Princess-Abbess Maria Waldburga Anna Truchsess von Zeil-Waldburg of Elten, Abbess of Vreden and St. Urusla in Köln (Germany)

She had been Abbess of of the Chapter of Vreden since 1764 and before that she had been canoness in Buchau 1757-64 She was elected as Abbess because of the support from Preussia, and was succeeded by candidate that was not elected in 1784, Josepha Maria Anna Antonia Nepomucena zu Salm-Reifferscheidt-Bedburg. She was was daughter of Count Franz Ernst and Eleonora von Köpnigsegg-Rothensfels and lived (1730-89).


Louise Adélaïde de Bourbon-Condé 1786-90 Princesse-Abbesse Louise Adélaïde de Bourbon-Condé of Remiremont (France)    
The Princess was the last Princess-Abbess of the most illustrious monastery in whole of Europe before the revolution. She had the title of Princesse d'Empire and was ruler of a number of lordships. During the revolution she was in exile in Belgium but later returned and founded a religious institution. The was daughter of Louis Joseph de Bourbon-Condé, Prince de Condé et Duc de Bourbon and Charlotte de Rohan-Soubise (1737-1760), and lived (1758-1824).

1787-1803 Princess-Abbess Sophie Albertine av Sverige of Quedlinburg (Germany)
The last Princess-Abbess or Reichsäbtissin of Quedlinburg, she had been elected Koadjutrix in 1767 and was one of the few to acctually reside in the territory, which at the time covered 102 square kilometers, most of the time - except for a stay in Sweden 1794-99. She found an administrational mess with no clear destinction of which authorlity lay by her and wich by the city. She reformed the educational system and became very popular. In 1801 the Imperial Diet met to reform the governing system in Germany and the number of states were reduced from around 1.500 to a few hundred. When Quedlinburg was incorporated into Prussia she changed her signature from "des kayserlich freyen weltlichen Stifts Quedlinburg Abbatissin" to "Des fürstlichen Stifts Quedlinburg Abbatissin" and her titulature change from "die Durchlauchtigste Fürstein und Frau Sophien Albertinen, Königliche prinzessin von Schweden, der Gothen und Wenden, Erbin von Norwegen, des kayserlinchen freyen Weltlinchn Stifts Quedlinburg Abbatissin" to "Frau Äbtissen königliche Hoheit wie auch dem Fürstlichen Stifts Amte". She later moved back to Sweden. The Swedish Princess was daughter of Karl XII of Sweden and Lovisa-Ulrika von Preussen, and lived (1753-1808).

1789-93 Princess-Abbess Maria Franzisca Xaveria von Königfeld of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)
Elected as successor of Anna Febronia Elisabeth von Speth-Zwyfalten. 

 

1789-94/99 Princess-Abbess Maria Theresia II van Bentinck of Munsterbilzen, Dame of Wellen, Haccourt, Hallembaye and Kleine-Spouwen (Belgium)

Because of the French Revolution, which also reached Liège, she did not mark her election with an "entry into her lordships", and was not hailed by her subjects such as her predecessors. The territory was occupied by the French forces 1792-93, by Imperial Troops 1793-94 and then again by the French. Very few ladies remained in the chapter, and Maria Theresia moved to Gerresheim. The adminsitration was taken over by the Vice-Dechanesses; Beate von Freyberg, who resigned in 1795 and by the 68 year old Margaretha d'Isendorn de Blois de Cannenbourg until the chapter was finally abolished. Maria Theresia was daughter of Freiherr Adrian Konstantin Ferdinand Joseph van Bentinck and Freiin Anna Franziska von Bocholtz, and lived (1739-99).


 

Until 1789 Princess-Abbess Madeleine Barbe de Landenberg of the Royal Abbey of Andlau (France)

Sold the chapter to her niece during the revolution, who married the Intendent of the Chapter, Keppeler, who became Prefect and Baron of the Empire. The chapter was abolished during the revolution in 1789


 

Until 1789  Reigning Abbess Charlotte-Julie le Normant of Faremoutiers (France)

Also known as Madame de Maupéou. Her family were councillors of Louis XV and Louis XVI. She succeeded Françoise de Molé, who reigned at dates not known to me.


 

1789-92 and 1795-98 Reigning Abbess-General María Teresa de Oruña of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

As Señora Abadesa of Las Huelgas, she was Head of the Lordships of Albillos, Alcucero, Arkanzón, Arroyak, Arrunquera, Arto, Barrio, Bercial, Can de muñó, Candasnos, Cardeñadijo, Castril de Peones, Cilleruelo de Hannoverquez, Congosto, Escobilla, Estepar, Fresno de Rodilla, Galarde, Gatón, Herramel, Herrín, La Llana, Lena, Loranquillo, Madrigalejo del Monte, Marcilla, Montornero, Olmillos, Ontiñena, Palanzuelos de la Sierrra, Piedrahita, Quintana de Loranco, Quintanilla de San García, Sargentes de Loxa, Requena, Revenga, Revilla del Campo, Revillagodos, Rivayaz, Robredo, San Mamés, San Memel, San Quirce de Humada, Saniuste, Santa Cruz de Juarros, Santa Lecina, Santa María de Invierno, Sargentes de Loxa, Tablada, Tardajos, Tinieblas, Torralba, Torre Sandino, Urrez, Valdazo, Villa Gonzalo de Pedernales, Villabáscones, Villaneueva, Villanueva de los Infantes, Villarmejo, Yarto and Zalduendo.

 

1789-98 Reigning Abbess Delphine Madeleine Elisabeth de Sabran-Baudinard of Chelles (France)

Daughter of Joseph-Jules-Honoré de Sabran-Baudinard and Marie-Thérèse d'Arlatan de Lauris, and lived (1734-1820).


1790-96 Princess-Abbess Josepha Maria Anna Antonia Nepomucena von Salm-Reifferscheidt-Bedburg of Elten, Abbess of Vreden (Germany)
She was brought up in Vienna and after the death of her father in 1755, her uncle, Leopold picked her and her brothers up, and secured her the position as Canoness of Elten, and on the way they visited Dresden, Meissen, Hubertusburg, Bautzen, Naumburg (Saale) and further places. She also received a Präbende Vreden, which was tied to her family. She became Küsterin in Vreden in 1763 even though she did not take oath of office as lady of the chapter until 1765 when she was permitted not to live in the chapter. She held the same office in Elten from 1766 and the same year she became a lady of the chapter of Essen which was considered more prestigious as an Imperial Immediate Secular Chapter (kaiserlich-freiweltliches Stift) than the High Countly Secular Chapter of Vreden (hochgräflich-freiweltliche Stift Vreden) and the Princely Secular Chapter of Elten (fürstlich-freiweltliche Stift). She became Dechantin in Vreden from 1779, in Essen 1782 and in Elten in 1784, but the same year she failed to be elected Abbess, because Prussia supported Walburga Maria Truchsess von Waldburg-Zeil-Wurzach, but she succeeded her after her death 6 year later, and also in January she was elected Abbess of Vreden. She was daughter of daughter of Altgraf Karl Anton Joseph zu Salm-Reifferscheidt-Bedburg and countess Maria Franziska de Paula Eleonora Esterhazy, and lived (1731-96).

Maria Anna von Habsburg-Lothringen 1791-1800 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna von Habsburg-Lothringen of the Theresian Chapter at the  Hradschin in Prague  (Austria-Hungary (Österreich-Ungarn))
4 days after her installation with her princely ecclesiastical rank, the Archduchess conducted the coronation - assisted by bishops - of her mother, Maria Ludovica de Borbon of Spain, as Queen of Bohemia. She and her husband, Leopold, had already been crowned as Holy Roman Emperor and Empress the previous year. Maria Anna resigned in 1800, and lived (1770-1809).

 

Around 1791 Abbess Nullius Giuditta Terami of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

The Kingdom of Napoli joined the first coalition in 1793, the kingdom was occupied by French troops and was declared to be abolished in 1799 and replaced by the Parthenopaean Republic which only lasted until June and Ferdinando I di Borbone was restored as king.


Maria Anna Vogel, Fürstäbtissin zu Heggbach 1792-1803 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Vogel aus Ummendorf of Heggbach (Germany)
Also known as Marianne, she was elected Abbess in the first round of voting against 5 other candidates. During her reign, the Chapter was marked by the wars with France 1790-1800, and she continued the daily routine of administering her territory with the knowledge that the French regime poised a great danger to the known world order. She secured the most valuable reliquia and send them to Switzerland. 1793 the first refugees arrived and 1796-97 the French troops laid down quarter and had to be fed. The Reichsdeputation assembled in Rastatt 1793-99 tried to prevent the inevitable and so did the College of Prelates in Ochnhausen in 1798, but when Emperor Franz II of Austria signed off the Left Bank of the Rhine to the French as part of the peace settlement, the fate of the ecclesiastical territories of Swabia was sealed and they were seculised. The nuns were allowed to stay at the chapter, which came in the possession of the Count of Waldbott-Bassenheim. But even though they were granted a pension, they lived in great poverty. 1806 the Abbey became part of the Kingdom of Württemberg, but the financial troubles continued. In 1875 Fürst von Waldburg-Wolfegg bought the building and gave it to the Franciscans in 1884, and it is still a convent today. She lived (1752-1835).

1792-95 Reigning Abbess-General María Rascón of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

She had the right to grant letters dismissorial for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests, within the limits of her abbatial jurisdiction.


 

From 1792 Reigning Coadjutress Gabrielle de Tane of the Royal Abbey of Jouarre (France)

Left with the nuns. Empty of its inhabitants, the abbey was divided into 34 lots and sold in 1793. The Church, the chapter and the cloister were destroyed, the claustral buildings were transformed into houses along roads cut across the Abbey. But out of the 58 nuns expelled a few stayed on in the village, succoured by the population. The locals carried the reliquaries, bells and statues of the Abbey to the Parish Church in order to save them from destruction. They even tried to make a request to the Committee for the Protection of the General Public in favour of the sisters. Those who came back discretely to live under the shadow the cloister were they had made profession were welcomed kindly repaying by their services and their example those who helped them. Twenty-six nuns survived in this way, waiting and watching in prayer. They bought back plots of the Abbey and kept a look-out for the eventuality of the revival of conventual life.


1793-1801 Princess-Abbess Maria Violanta von Lerchenfeld-Premberg of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)
The Countess was member of the family of Counts of The Realm of Lerchenfeld-Siessbach-Prennberg.

1793-1806 Administrator Coadjutrix Johanna Caroline von Oettingen-Spielberg of Säckingen (Germany)

Because of the advanced age of Fürstäbtissin Maria Anna von Hornstein-Göffingen, she was elected as Koadjutorin der Äbtissin and confirmed by the Austrian government and took over the administration during the last years of the existance of the chapter. She was daughter of Anton Ernst von Oettingen-Spielberg and Maria Thereia Walpurga von Waldbrg zu Trauchburg and lived (1728).


1794-95 Acting Head Beate von Freyberg  of Munsterbilzen (Belgium)
Soon after she was appointed Vice-Dechaness, she became Acting Head of the Chapter after t as Princess-Abbess Maria Theresia van Bentnick had sought refuge in Gerresheim in 1794. She resigned because she did not feal up to the task of running the task during the French occupation.

1795-98 Acting Head Margaretha d'Isendorn de Blois de Cannenbourg of Munsterbilzen (Belgium)
Took over as Vice-Dechaness and de-facto Leader of the Chapter after the resignation of Beate von Freyberg as the Princess-Abbess had left the territory. She tried to steer the chapter through the hardship of the French occupation and Presided over the final Gathering of the Chapter before it was closed down. She spend the rest of her life by her family, and lived (1727-1817).

1795-97 Acting Head Clementine Franziska von Hessen-Rheinfels-Rotenburg of Thorn (The Netherlands)

As Dechaness, the Landgravine took the reigns after the French occupation, the Princess-Abbess Maria Kunigunde von Sachen, Princess of Poland, stayed in Essen to take care of the insterests of the chapter. In 1796 a bill was passed banning religious establishments with either female or male inhabitants. As Thorn had both canonesses and canons, they argued that the law did not include them. When a law was passed banning all religious establishments, Clementine claimed that Thorn was a secular domain, but the chapter was finally abolished in 1797. Both she and Maria Kunigunde were busy buying back lands - securing the role of a "Free Lordship of the Realm" (Freie Reichsherrlichkeiten), leaving the French only in charge of the administration of the chapter, as all Ecclesiastical Territories were abolished by the Imperial Diet in 1803. She was also Abbess of Van Sint Salvator Te Susteren (Süsteren) and Dechaness in Elten. Klementine Franziska Ernestina Leopoldina was daughter of Konstantin von Hessen-Rheinfels-Rotenburg and his second wife, Marie Jeannette de Bombelles, and lived (1747-1813).


1796-1803 Princess-Abbess Maximiliana Franziska de Paula zu Salm-Reifferscheid of Elten (Germany)
King Friederich Wilhelm III von Pressen incorporated the 14 square kilomeres large state with its 1.500 inhabitants in his own lands in 1802. This made it possible for protestants to live in the town, which had not been allowed before. The territory lost it's indenpendence (Reichsunmittelbarkeit) and shortly before the French occupation the Minister of State Count von Schulenburg, withdrew all special rights that belonged to the town through centuries of reign by the Abbess. The lands of the chapter was annexed by the French in 1811, but the ladies of the chapter was given a pension for life. She was daughter of Prince Siegmund zu Salm-Reifferscheid and Countess Eleonora von Walburg zu Zeil und Wurzbach, and lived (1765-1805).

Fürstäbtissin Maria Juliana Maier 1796-1803 Princess-Abbess Maria Juliana Maier of Rottenmünster (Germany)
She was the last Fürstäbtissin of the Imperial Immediate Zisterzienserinnen-Reichsabtei Rottenmünster before the ecclesiastical territory was secularized and became a part of Württemberg in 1803. She lived in the convent until her death and the last lady of the chapter left it in 1850. (d. 1826).

 

1796-1810 Princess-Abbess Maria Walburga Theresia von Liebenfels-Worblingen of Schänis (Switzerland)
1798-1810 Reigning Lady of Worblingen and Beuren an der Aach in Hegau and Co-Lady of Liebburg (Switzerland)

As a result of the end of the old Swiss Confederation (alten Eidgenossenschaft) in 1798, the Fürstliche Reichsstift (The Princely Chapter of the Realm) lost all its feudal rights in 1803 and became part of the Canton of Sankt Gallen. It gradually had to give up its possessions outside the Canton and in 1811 the Grand Council of the canton decided to abolish the chapter. The convent house was sold, and the church of the chapter was taken over by the parish. Her bother was the last male member of the Liebenfels-Worblingen family and she inherited the Lordship of Worblingen and the Liebenfels'sche and the Worblinger Castles after his death in 1798. She was daughter of Christoph Albert zu Worblingen (Hegau) and Maria Anna Josepha Eleonora von Hornstein zu Weiterdingen, and (d. 1810). 


1797-1800 Princess-Abbess Maria Anna Franziska Susanna Clara Ferdinanda von Ulm-Langenrhein of Lindau (Germany)
The Freiin (Baroness) was the last sovereign Princess-Abbess of Lindau, as the office was vacant until 1803, when the territory became a secular county. The following year it was annexed to Austria, 1805 to Bavaria and finally in 1806 it was incorporated in Württemberg.

1798-1801 Reigning Abbess-General Micaela de Osorio of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Her family were Counts of Trastamara and Marqueses of Astorga.


 

1799-1807 Reigning Abbess Maria Johanna Baptista von Zweyer auf Hoenbach of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

She had first tried to become a member of the Chapter of Frauenalb but did not have enough funds to pay the fees. Instead she spend a "test year" in Wald and was admitted because of her "special and exceptional abilities. Mentioned as Prioriss 1773-99. The territory was secularied as a result of the Reichsdeputationshauptschluss and became part of the Principality of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, whose ruler, Prince Anton Aloys, made an agreement with the ladies of the chapter that she would recieve a sum of money for the rest of their lives, but they were not allowed to accept more canonesses into the chapter. In 1806 Hohenzollern annexed the Chapter and Office of Wald (Kloster und Amt) and the Offices of Vernhof and Ennigerloh. She was daughter of Freiherr Karl von Zweyer.


1801-03 Princess-Abbess Maria Helene von Freien-Seiboltsdorf of Niedermünster in Regensburg (Germany)
The last ruler of the state, which was secularized in 1803 and became a part of Bavaria in 1815. Her family was first named as nobles of Seyboldsdorf in 740. The family became Free Lords and Counts of the Realm and also using the name of von Freyen-Seyboldsdorf.

1801-05 Reigning Abbess-General Francisca Montoya of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Exercised an unlimited secular authority over more than 60 villages and held her own courts.


 

1801-09 Abbess Nullius Aurora Accolti Gil of the Royal Convent of San Benedetto in Conversano, Temporal and Secular Ruler of Conversano (Italy)

The feudal system was abolished in 1806 during the French occupation, and her quasi episcopal powers terminated and the chapter was incorporated into the diocese of Conversano. (d. 1809-).


1802 Princess-Abbess Maria Xaveria Lohmiller of Baindt (Germany)
Shortly after she became leader of the territory, she married Caspar Oexlq and the position of Sovereign Reichsfürstin of the Ecclesiastical Territory was never filled again. In November the Count von Leyden occupied the territory, but a few months year later it was taken over by the count of Aspermont-Linden and was later incorporated into the Kingdom of Würrtemberg. Xaveria (d. 1836).

1802-16 Reigning Abbess Auguste Elisabeth von Seckendorff of the Immediate Chapter of Kraichgau (Germany)
When the Knight's Canton of Kraichau, the Imperial Immediate Noble Kraichgauian Chapter for Noble Ladies (Kaiserliche Reichsfreie Adeliche Kraichgauer Fräulein-Stift) was abolished in 1806, a Family Council consisting of members of the former Canton took over the administration. It still supports "Evangelical noble ladies in need", and still exists today.

1805-15 Reigning Abbess-General Bernarda de Orense of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Because of the French Invasion she had to abandon the Community 1812-15 as the first Abbess ever since the foundation.


Laetitia Murat, Princess-Abbess of Elten

1805-11 Titular Princess-Abbess Laetitia Murat of Elten (Germany)

Also known as Princess Marie Letizia Josephine Annonciade Murat. The territory had originally been abolished in 1803 and incorporated into the Grand Duchy of Berg, but the new Grand Duke of Berg, Joachm Murat got permission by Napoleon I to name her to the position of Princess-Abbess. The chapter was abolished when he became King of Napoli in 1811. She married Guido Taddeo, Marchese Pepoli, Conte di Castiglione (1789-1852), had several children, and lived (1802-59).


 

1807-51 Reigning Abbess Maria Josefa von Würz à Rudenz of Wald, Lady of the Offices of Wald, Vernhof and Ennigerloh (Germany)

The chapter wich had been part of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen since 1806 was finally incorporated into Preusssia in 1848.


Juliane Louise Amelia of Hessen-Kassel 1810-60 Politcally Influential Abbess Juliane Louise Amelia of Hessen-Kassel of Itzehoe in Schleswig-Hostein (Denmark and Germany)
Because of her involvement in social charities, development of health facilities etc., she became very influential in the Northern state in Germany. Itzehoe was a Protestant Adeliches Damenstift (Noble Ladies' Chapter). It was never an independent eccleastical territory, but it was important as a major landowner. She was daughter of Landgrave Karl von Hessen-Kassel and Louise of Denmark, and lived (1773-1861).

1815-18 and 1827-30 Reigning Abbess-General María Lorenza de Orense of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Had the right to grant letters dismissorial for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests, within the limits of her abbatial jurisdiction, to hear confessions, to preach, and to engage in the cure of souls.


1818-21 Reigning Abbess-General María Manuela de Lizana of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Probably related to Francisco Javier de Lizana y Beaumont (17501811). Bishop of Mexico and Vice-Roy of New Spain.


1821-24 Reigning Abbess-General María Francisca Benita de los Ríos   of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Among the many dignities and high offices held by the abbess of Las Huelgas was that of the title of Abbess General of the Order for the Kingdom of Leon and Castile dating from 1189, wich gave her the privilege of convoking a general chapter at Burgos each year.


1824-27 and  1830-33 Reigning Abbess-General María Tomasa Orense Rábago of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Temporal and secular ruler of vast territories in northern Spain.


1833-36 and  1838-44 Reigning Abbess-General María Benita Rascón of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

She held quasi episcopal authority of the territory.


1834-35 Princess-Abbess Maria Theresia von Habsburg of the Theressian Chapter for Noble Ladies at the Hradschin of Prague  (Austria-Hungary (Österreich-Ungarn))
She resigned as Abbess of the Royal Chapter to marry king Fernando II of Two Sicilies in 1835. In 1859 her stepson became king, but only one year later he had to resign as a result of the unification of Italy. She was daughter of Archduke Karl and Henriette von Nassau-Weilburg, the mother of two daughters and lived (1816-67).

1835-42 Princess-Abbess Hermine von Habsburg-Lothringen of the Theressian Royal and Imperial Chapter for Noble Ladies at the Hradschin in Prague  (Austria-Hungary)
Daughter of Josef Anton von Habsburg-Lothringen and Princess Hermine von Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym, who died aged 20, after having given birth to Hermine and her twin brother, Stefan Viktor. As abbess she enjoyed princely ecclesiastical rank. She dedicated here life to charity but died at the age of only 25, after having lived (1817-42).

1836-38 and 1847-50 Reigning Abbess-General María Manuela Montoya of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Exercised an unlimited secular authority over more than 60 lordships and villages and held her own courts.


1844-52 Princess-Abbess Maria Karolina von Habsburg of the Theressian Chapter for Noble Ladies at the Hradschin of Prague  (Austria-Hungary (Österreich-Ungarn))

As abbess the Archduchess enjoyed princely ecclesiastical rank (fürstliche geistliche würde), only temporal duties and a high income. Her sister, Maria Theresia, was abbess around 1834-35. Maria Karoline married her cousin, Archduke Rainer, and became known as "Aunt Marie Rainer", she had no children, and lived (1825-1915). 


1844-47 Reigning Abbess-General María Teresa Bonifaz Bustamante of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

She had the right to grant letters dismissorial for ordination, and issued licenses authorizing priests, within the limits of her abbatial jurisdiction, to hear confessions, to preach, and to engage in the cure of souls.


1850-53 Reigning Abbess-General María Concepción Casilda de Rozas  of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Had the privilege to confirm Abbesses, to impose censures, and to convoke synods.


1858-61 Reigning Abbess-General María Antonia González Agüero of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Her full title was "noble Lady, the superior, prelate, and lawful administratrix in spirituals and temporals of the royal abbey". 


1861-64 and 1883-84 Reigning Abbess-General María Bernarda Ruiz Puente  of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

During her second term in office she no longer held quasi episcopal powers, as they had been revoked in 1873 after the First Vatican Council 1769-70.


1864-67, 1876-79 and 1884-87 Reigning Abbess-General María Bernarda Tagle de Quevedo of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

During her two last tenures, she did not hold quasi episcopal powers.


1867-70 Reigning Abbess-General María Benita Rodríguez of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

Temporal and secular ruler of the territory which belonged to the convent.


1870-76 and 1879-83 Reigning Abbess-General  María Pilar Ugarte of the Royal Monastery of Santa Maria la Real de Las Huelgas in Burgos (Spain)

She was the last abbess anywhere to hold quasi episcopal powers, when her right of jurisdiction was abolished in 1873. All institutes were to be put under the jurisdiction of the bishop of the diocese in which the houses were situated; this corresponds to the main point of the Concordat arranged between Pope Pius VII and Napoleon, and which was still in force. She protested against the abolision of her quasi episcopal and other ancient religious and temporal privilleges, but the Archbishop of Burgos made a judgment stating that the decision was correct.


1875-79 Princess-Abbess Maria Christina von Habsburg-Este of The Theresianian Noble Chapter at the Hradschin in Prague  (Austria-Hungary)
1885-1902 Queen Regent H.M. Doña María Cristina de Habsburgo-Loreno y Habsurgo-Este of Spain 
The Archduchess was Regent of Spain and its colonies, first during the vacancy of the throne and pending the gestation of a posthumous heir - her son Alfonso XIII (1886-1931-41), who was born 6 months after the death of her husband Alfonso XII. As President of the Council of State she was in close contact with the Premier and the other ministers. Politically the period was characterized, by constant switching of terms in office by the liberal and conservative political parties. Cuba, the Philippines and Puerto Rico were lost to USA. During her term in office, a wavering policy was used for facing the problems in Morocco during the first war of Melilla, (1893). Also, by agreement with France, the borders of the Spanish Continental Guinea were established, (1900). The regent was always highly esteemed because of her great discretion and tact and, after her son came of age, she devoted herself exclusively to family life and good charible works. She had been Princess-Abbess  of Prague  until their marriage in 1879, and lived (1859-1929).

1886-93 Princess-Abbess Margaretha Sophie von Habsburg-Lothringen of The Theresianian Noble Chapter at the Hradschin in Prague  (Austria-Hungary)
The Abbey was founded by Empress Maria Theresia in 1755. As abbess she enjoyed princely ecclesiastical rank (fürstliche geistliche würde), only temporal duties and a high income. Daughter of Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria (1833-96) and  Maria Annunziata of The Two Sicilies (1843-71). In 1893 she married Albrecht von Württemberg (1865-1939), mother of three sons and lived (1870-1902).

1893-94 Princess-Abbess Karoline Immaculata von Habsburg-Toscana of The Theresianian Noble Chapter at the Hradschin in Prague  (Austria-Hungary)

The Archduchess was also known as Carolina, she was daughter of Archduke Karl Salvator of Austria, Prince of Tuscany (1839-92) and Maria Immacolata of The Two Sicilies (1844-99) and married Prince August Leopold von Sachsen-Coburg-Gotha (1867-1922) and lived (1869-1945). 


1894-1918 Princess-Abbess Maria Annunziata von Habsburg-Lothringen of The Theresianian Noble Chapter at the Hradschin in Prague  (Austria-Hungary)

Also was known as Miana, the Archduchess was the daughter of Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria and his third wife, Maria Teresa da Bragança. She acted as "first Lady" at the court of her father's brother, Emperor Franz Joseph after his wife, Empress Elisabeth, was murdered in 1898. Her oldest brother, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, was the Heir to the Throne until he was killed 1914, and her second brother's son was emperor Karl I (1887-1916-18-2). She was unmarried and lived (1876-1961). 


Last update 12.12.15

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